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The Bologna Process as a hegemonic tool of Normative Power Europe (NPE)

the case of Chilean and Mexican higher education
Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis Ltd.
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
8:2, pp.247-256.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The scenario of Latin America in the higher education area, especially in Chile and Mexico, appears to be significantly affected by some European influences. We can see this by examining the implementation of two ‘hegemonic tools’: the Bologna Process and the Tuning Project. This paper argues that if we analyse the European influences as a normative power (NPE) on the construction of a common space in higher education in Chile and Mexico, the hegemonic process may, perhaps, prove to be focused on an ‘alternative imperialism’, based on Eurocentric discourse, which could also be called a ‘post‐colonialist’ strategy. This article will seek to show that European influences, exercised by the EU operating as a normative power, are only the ‘tip of the iceberg’ of the hegemonic process. The paper is divided into five parts: following the introduction, a general overview of the Bologna Process opens the discussion of questions of American or European hegemony. After that, I analyse NPE and the ‘ontological quality’ of the EU as a hegemonic power. The empirical cases of European influences, on Chilean and Mexican HE, are analysed in detail in order to show the most significant impacts on their public and university policies. Finally, I offer a view of the Bologna Process as a ‘European hegemonic instrument’ of NPE.

Emigrant Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Emigrant Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Publisher: 
FLACSO-Chile
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
358 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Nation-states are no longer contained by their borders. In times of mass migration and ever more dense transnational networks, states of all sizes and all migration profiles reach out to their emigrated citizens in wholly new ways. The variety of policies that target emigrants (“emigrant policies”) is so vast that it seems to have become a new state function. For example, it is well known that states are expanding citizen participation beyond the nation’s boundaries through voting rights and new modalities of representation and that they are opening channels for remittance transfer and offering specific investment opportunities to returning emigrants. However, other, less studied emigrant policies, comprise the symbolic incorporation of emigrants into the nation-state (e.g. through awards celebrating emigrants’ achievements); social service provisions for non-residents (e.g. health and education); and the institutional inclusion of emigrants in consultative bodies, to name just a few.
This book is the first to systematically take stock of the emigrant policies in place across 22 Latin American and Caribbean countries, as of 2015. By covering an entire geographical region and being based on rigorous data-collection, this will be a reference in a literature that has so far centered on a few specific cases. Also, our proposed definition of “emigrant policies” encompasses a wide range of policies that are aimed at emigrants beyond the “usual suspects” analyzed in the extant literature (electoral, citizenship, and economic policies), resulting in 112 different dimensions. This survey of such a broad sample of countries and policy dimensions will allow researchers to theorize and make comparisons on models of emigrant policy on a solid empirical and conceptual base.

Cooperation Program between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policies

Action Document for COPOLAD II - Cooperation Programme between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policie
Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Abstract: 
The proposed action “COPOLAD II – Cooperation programme between Latin America, theCaribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policies” is part of the Multi-Annual Regional Indicative Programme for Latin America for the financial period 2014-2020, specifically the priority area on the security-development nexus, which seeks to promote security conditions conducive to inclusive development. Building on the first phase of COPOLAD, this particular action aims at supporting the capacity of beneficiary states and communities to develop integrated, balanced and human rights-based national drug policies covering both drug demand and supply reduction efforts, in line with the principle of co-responsibility. Expected
results are an increased capacity to monitor drug issues and to formulate integrated, balanced and evidence-based drug policies at national level; reduced drug production, reduced demand and harm of drugs and reduced levels of drug trafficking; strengthened action against illicit financial flows and money laundering deriving from drug trafficking; increased control of precursors; and a strengthened EU-CELAC (Community of Latin American and Caribbean States) Coordination and Cooperation Mechanism on Drugs. During the identification and formulation phases, the results and lessons learnt of the ongoing (first) phase of COPOLAD as well as of other relevant EU initiatives, like the Cocaine Route Programme, funded under the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace, were carefully analysed and taken into account. Preliminary consultations were also carried out with the Latin American and Caribbean beneficiaries.

Contributions made by decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America to territorial cooperation in Latin America

issues for debate
Contributions made by decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America to territorial cooperation in Latin America
Publisher: 
OCD
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
142 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The present study is the result of a process of reflection carried out under the auspices of the Observatory on Decentralised Cooperation (OCD) between the European Union and Latin America regarding the phenomenon of territorial cooperation in both regions. Its aim is to reflect upon the relevance and potential that public decentralised cooperation between Europe and Latin America has to strengthen in a decisive manner the territorial cooperation processes already underway in Latin America.The starting point for the study is the conviction that the territorial cooperation dynamics that have emerged in the heart of the European Union have been especially rich and that the experience accumulated in this fi eld represents a fundamental contribution to regional integration processes. The second important point of departure is the recognition that public decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America is an emerging phenomenon, whose dynamism and specifi characteristics make it a privileged channel for the exchange of experiences between both regions and a means of enhancing local authorities’s administrative capacities and strengthening policies to promote social cohesion from a territorial perspective.It is these two premises that stimulated the Observatory’s interest in researching the extent to which decentralised cooperation could contribute to making territorial cooperation in Latin America more dynamic.

Progress in the Pattern of Intra-industrial Trade Between the European Union and Latin America

The Cases of Brazil and Mexico
Progress in the pattern of intra-industrial trade between the European Union and Latin America : the cases of Brazil and Mexico
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
253 p.
Abstract: 
This study looks into the commercial and productive relationships between the European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), with a particular focus on Brazil and Mexico and their main European trade partners (France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and United Kingdom). The authors of the study have traced changes in the intra-industrial trade patterns between the EU and LAC over the past two decades, and in so doing, they have adopted a novel North-South dimension which until now has not figured prominently in analyses of intra-industrial trade.

China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union

a triangular relationship?
China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union: a triangular relationship?
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Abstract: 
These are the Conference Proceedings of the Workshop-Seminar “China, Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union – A triangular relationship?”
Based on China’s emergence as a new economic and political power and an active member of the international community, as well as the increasingly complex political and economic relationships this country has established both towards the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean, the conveners of the Workshop-Seminar invited distinguished experts, scholars and representatives from international institutions to discuss the current political and economic dynamics between the three parties, and their implications. By identifying potential scenarios, opportunities, risks and challenges, the participants provided first-hand insights and assessed, in exchange with the audience, whether there was room for an enhanced political and economic collaboration between the three regions.

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

A comparative reassessment of regional parliaments in Latin America

Parlasur, Parlandino and Parlatino
Publisher: 
IBRI
City: 
Brasilia
Volume, number, page: 
60:1, pp.1-18.
Abstract: 
The present article assesses and compares the MERCOSUR Parliament, the Andean Parliament, and the Latin American Parliament as instruments to insert political representation and parliamentarians in their respective integration projects. It is argued that the development of regional parliaments in Latin America, however, has not produced substantial changes in regional decisionmaking processes, which remain the exclusive domain of intergovernmental or interpresidential exchanges.

The free trade agreement between the European Union and Mexico

impact on trade and foreign direct investment
Publisher: 
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
43:1, pp.115-135
Abstract: 
The Free Trade Agreement between the European Union and Mexico (FTA EU-MX) has contributed to reactivate the economic relations between them since they have implemented the global agreement that came into effect in the year 2000 and that has permitted that the economic and trade relations between both parties have strengthened.
However, it will be shown that there does exist the need to adapt the FTA EU-MX to the actual national, regional and international circumstances and to promote changes in order to gain more benefits for Mexico and its population.

Eco-innovation – a new paradigm for latin america

Publisher: 
Centro Universitário Feevale
City: 
Novo Hamburgo
Volume, number, page: 
12:1, pp. 148-159
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Global phenomena of climate change on the one hand and not predictable technological risks of energy supply on the other hand are challenging not only Germany and the European Union but society, politics, science and industry worldwide. The answers to these challenges are very different. Some countries are screening their existing energy concepts and are searching ways of alternative energy, such as legislation on clean technologies, so-called eco-innovation. It is especially this shift to eco—innovation that catches our attention. It is not reserved for energy technologies, ustainable production can also be meant in other industries, such as textile. But in the ongoing of the energy turn policies promoting renewable energies increasingly subsumed the concept (COO KE 2010). In the last decades energy policy lived a process of securitization. The connotation of energy policy with the field of security policy automatically led to a change of steering with rather hierarchical modes of governance. The shift towards innovation policy therefore means not also a reorientation of concepts but also a shift of governance towards multi-levelgovernance
(KERN; BULKELEY, 2009) – so far the debate in Europe. How is this concept discussed in Latin America? While the shift towards renewable energy is a quite new debate for Europe, Brazil had already a share of 58,4% of renewables on total energy production in 1970 (MAIHOLD; MÜLLER, 2012). Nevertheless compliance to renewable energy not always meant sustainable innovation. How is the concept of ecoinnovation discussed in Latin America? And how far can we observe the above described shift? In order to shed first insight on these questions we analyze the innovation plans of Argentine, Brazil and Mexico with focus on the link between ecology, innovation and renewable energies. We use the software Atlas.ti to research the plans with a co-occurrence analysis.

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