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Contributions made by decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America to territorial cooperation in Latin America

issues for debate
Contributions made by decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America to territorial cooperation in Latin America
Publisher: 
OCD
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
142 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The present study is the result of a process of reflection carried out under the auspices of the Observatory on Decentralised Cooperation (OCD) between the European Union and Latin America regarding the phenomenon of territorial cooperation in both regions. Its aim is to reflect upon the relevance and potential that public decentralised cooperation between Europe and Latin America has to strengthen in a decisive manner the territorial cooperation processes already underway in Latin America.The starting point for the study is the conviction that the territorial cooperation dynamics that have emerged in the heart of the European Union have been especially rich and that the experience accumulated in this fi eld represents a fundamental contribution to regional integration processes. The second important point of departure is the recognition that public decentralised cooperation between the European Union and Latin America is an emerging phenomenon, whose dynamism and specifi characteristics make it a privileged channel for the exchange of experiences between both regions and a means of enhancing local authorities’s administrative capacities and strengthening policies to promote social cohesion from a territorial perspective.It is these two premises that stimulated the Observatory’s interest in researching the extent to which decentralised cooperation could contribute to making territorial cooperation in Latin America more dynamic.

Progress in the Pattern of Intra-industrial Trade Between the European Union and Latin America

The Cases of Brazil and Mexico
Progress in the pattern of intra-industrial trade between the European Union and Latin America : the cases of Brazil and Mexico
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
253 p.
Abstract: 
This study looks into the commercial and productive relationships between the European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), with a particular focus on Brazil and Mexico and their main European trade partners (France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and United Kingdom). The authors of the study have traced changes in the intra-industrial trade patterns between the EU and LAC over the past two decades, and in so doing, they have adopted a novel North-South dimension which until now has not figured prominently in analyses of intra-industrial trade.

China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union

a triangular relationship?
China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union: a triangular relationship?
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Abstract: 
These are the Conference Proceedings of the Workshop-Seminar “China, Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union – A triangular relationship?”
Based on China’s emergence as a new economic and political power and an active member of the international community, as well as the increasingly complex political and economic relationships this country has established both towards the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean, the conveners of the Workshop-Seminar invited distinguished experts, scholars and representatives from international institutions to discuss the current political and economic dynamics between the three parties, and their implications. By identifying potential scenarios, opportunities, risks and challenges, the participants provided first-hand insights and assessed, in exchange with the audience, whether there was room for an enhanced political and economic collaboration between the three regions.

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

A comparative reassessment of regional parliaments in Latin America

Parlasur, Parlandino and Parlatino
Publisher: 
IBRI
City: 
Brasilia
Volume, number, page: 
60:1, pp.1-18.
Abstract: 
The present article assesses and compares the MERCOSUR Parliament, the Andean Parliament, and the Latin American Parliament as instruments to insert political representation and parliamentarians in their respective integration projects. It is argued that the development of regional parliaments in Latin America, however, has not produced substantial changes in regional decisionmaking processes, which remain the exclusive domain of intergovernmental or interpresidential exchanges.

The free trade agreement between the European Union and Mexico

impact on trade and foreign direct investment
Publisher: 
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
43:1, pp.115-135
Abstract: 
The Free Trade Agreement between the European Union and Mexico (FTA EU-MX) has contributed to reactivate the economic relations between them since they have implemented the global agreement that came into effect in the year 2000 and that has permitted that the economic and trade relations between both parties have strengthened.
However, it will be shown that there does exist the need to adapt the FTA EU-MX to the actual national, regional and international circumstances and to promote changes in order to gain more benefits for Mexico and its population.

Eco-innovation – a new paradigm for latin america

Publisher: 
Centro Universitário Feevale
City: 
Novo Hamburgo
Volume, number, page: 
12:1, pp. 148-159
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Global phenomena of climate change on the one hand and not predictable technological risks of energy supply on the other hand are challenging not only Germany and the European Union but society, politics, science and industry worldwide. The answers to these challenges are very different. Some countries are screening their existing energy concepts and are searching ways of alternative energy, such as legislation on clean technologies, so-called eco-innovation. It is especially this shift to eco—innovation that catches our attention. It is not reserved for energy technologies, ustainable production can also be meant in other industries, such as textile. But in the ongoing of the energy turn policies promoting renewable energies increasingly subsumed the concept (COO KE 2010). In the last decades energy policy lived a process of securitization. The connotation of energy policy with the field of security policy automatically led to a change of steering with rather hierarchical modes of governance. The shift towards innovation policy therefore means not also a reorientation of concepts but also a shift of governance towards multi-levelgovernance
(KERN; BULKELEY, 2009) – so far the debate in Europe. How is this concept discussed in Latin America? While the shift towards renewable energy is a quite new debate for Europe, Brazil had already a share of 58,4% of renewables on total energy production in 1970 (MAIHOLD; MÜLLER, 2012). Nevertheless compliance to renewable energy not always meant sustainable innovation. How is the concept of ecoinnovation discussed in Latin America? And how far can we observe the above described shift? In order to shed first insight on these questions we analyze the innovation plans of Argentine, Brazil and Mexico with focus on the link between ecology, innovation and renewable energies. We use the software Atlas.ti to research the plans with a co-occurrence analysis.

Research on Biodiversity and Climate Change at a Distance

Collaboration Networks between Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean.
Publisher: 
PLOS
City: 
San Francisco
Volume, number, page: 
11:6: pp.1-19.
Abstract: 
Biodiversity loss and climate change are both globally significant issues that must be addressed through collaboration across countries and disciplines. With the December 2015 COP21 climate conference in Paris and the recent creation of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), it has become critical to evaluate the capacity for global research networks to develop at the interface between biodiversity and climate change. In the context of the European Union (EU) strategy to stand as a world leader in tackling global challenges, the European Commission has promoted ties between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) in science, technology and innovation.
However, it is not clear how these significant interactions impact scientific cooperation at the interface of biodiversity and climate change. We looked at research collaborations between two major regions—the European Research Area (ERA) and LAC—that addressed both biodiversity and climate change. We analysed the temporal evolution of these collaborations, whether they were led by ERA or LAC teams, and which research
domains they covered. We surveyed publications listed on the Web of Science that were authored by researchers from both the ERA and LAC and that were published between 2003 and 2013. We also run similar analyses on other topics and other continents to provide baseline comparisons. Our results revealed a steady increase in scientific co-authorships between ERA and LAC countries as a result of the increasingly complex web of relationships that has been weaved among scientists from the two regions. The ERA-LAC coauthorship increase for biodiversity and climate change was higher than those reported forother topics and for collaboration with other continents. We also found strong differences in international collaboration patterns within the LAC: co-publications were fewest from researchers in low- and lower-middle-income countries and most prevalent from researchers in emerging countries like Mexico and Brazil. Overall, interdisciplinary publications represented 25.8%of all publications at the interface of biodiversity and climate change in the ERA-LAC network. Further scientific collaborations should be promoted 1) to prevent less developed countries from being isolated from the global cooperation network, 2) to ensure that scientists from these countries are trained to lead visible and recognized biodiversity and climate change research, and 3) to develop common study models that better integrate multiple scientific disciplines and better support decision-making.

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.

The free trade agreements between the european union and latin america. the peruvian and mexican case

Publisher: 
Nicolae Titulescu University Publishing House
City: 
Bucharest
Volume, number, page: 
5:1, pp.817-827
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The European Union has signed a number of free trade agreements with different countries in Latin America because it is aware of the great importance that this region has gained as a destination for its exports and investments. Furthermore, the European Union wishes to reaffirm its ties with countries in the region because it hopes to consolidate its political and economic position as an international player with its presence in those markets.
In this paper we will discuss the free trade agreements that the EU has signed with Mexico and later with Peru, because they are two examples where Latin American countries have achieved significant economic growth and where the trade has generated significant benefits. Additionally they are two major trading partners of the European Union and they have allowed the EU to continue to expand its zone of influence in Latin America.

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