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Germany–Latin America :

Fostering Strategic Alliances for a Global Energy Transition
Publisher: 
KAS-Peru
City: 
Lima
Volume, number, page: 
5p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Latin America is of strategic importance for Germany’s international sustainable energy policies. Sustainable energy technologies not only have a large potential market in Latin America but also offer opportunities to address some of the region’s pressing issues. Moreover, Latin America offers interesting learning opportunities. In several Latin American countries, electricity supply has traditionally been based on renewable energies – namely hydropower. In some Latin American countries, bioenergy has become an important pillar of electricity and fuel supply. New renewable energy technologies such as wind and solar energy have recently gained ground. However, the region also has large oil and gas reserves. With growing energy demand, the expansion of new renewable energies goes hand in hand with rising demand for conventional energy. Moreover, Latin America is a strong voice in global efforts to mitigate climate change. The region is exposed to some of the most severe effects of climate change in the form of droughts, glacial retreat and rising sea levels. Droughts increasingly pose an energy security challenge in Latin American countries that are highly reliant on hydropower. Three Latin American countries are of particular relevance for German efforts to build alliances for a global energy transition: Germany has established bilateral energy partnerships with the regional heavyweights Brazil and Mexico, while Argentina has taken over the G20 presidency from Germany in 2018 and will thus play a central role in shaping the global energy agenda throughout its presidency.

Forging Bonds with Emigrants :

Challenges for Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean
Publisher: 
GIGA
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
53 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This document is based on the discussions which developed within the framework of the Seminar “Forging Bonds with Emigrants: Challenges for Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean” (https://www.giga-hamburg.de/forging-bonds-eulac), organised by the EU-LAC Foundation, the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies and the Development Bank of Latin America (CAF), which took place at the Senate of the city of Hamburg, Germany, on September 18th to 20th, 2017.
Current debates on the subject of migration in Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean revolve around the challenges
posed by the increase in migration flows and the integration of immigrants in the States receiving them (Migration Policy Institute 2016). Much less attention is paid to the fact that some countries of these regions are exemplary in terms of the policies they have developed towards their emigrants. To better understand the migratory phenomenon and identify possibilities for international cooperation in this area, it is essential to understand that all immigrants are also emigrants. It is therefore also fundamental to investigate the policies adopted by the countries of origin to create or maintain links with their communities of citizens residing abroad. This article offers insights to understand these policies from a comparative perspective, illustrating good practices and making recommendations to help academia, private stakeholders, civil society and policy-makers to improve these bonds. In addition to the institutional agents, the migrants in the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean are also principal stakeholders in the bi-regional relationship; their presence helps us to appreciate the relevance and necessity of the relationship between these regions and demonstrates the importance of a structured bi-regional dialogue on migration to resolve these challenges.

European influence on the development of domestic policies in Chile and Mexico :

the case of Higher Education
City: 
Birmingham
Volume, number, page: 
393 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The EU as an ideational actor has a significant impact on non-European countries. This thesis examines the growth of European ideas circulating throughout the field of Latin American Higher Education (HE), as part of the Bologna Process, which has manifested itself in a set of procedures, methods and tools that have contributed to the transformation of Chilean and Mexican HE. This phenomenon requires a rigorous analysis of
European ideational factors present within Normative Power Europe (NPE), not only through a cluster of ideas, norms, principles and values but also through analysing language. The thesis examines such claims, focusing on Chile and Mexico,and argues that the impact of European influences upon received countries is mediated by domestic circumstances. The thesis makes a contribution to both existing understanding of the European Union’s influence over Latin America and Latin American HE, and also seeks to advance upon existing debates around the notion of Normative Power Europe in particular, by illustrating how the NPE literature would benefit from a deeper consideration of the use of language and considering translation processes of receiver countries.

Europe and Latin America :

combating drugs and drug trafficking
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
26 p.
Abstract: 
Two decades of cooperation between Europe and Latin America to combat drugs and drug trafficking have had a limited impact in terms of reducing drug consumption and production and have not led to better control of the criminal networks involved in the trafficking. Given this lack of decisive progress, fresh debate is emerging in Latin America on possible alternatives to the traditional models for tackling drugs, which are often seen as increasingly obsolete. These alternatives include measures such as decriminalisation and partial regulation of the drugs market. This study contains recent data on illegal drug consumption and production in the EU and Latin America, a general overview of the policies adopted in both regions, and analysis of the main bi-regional cooperation tools and main aspects of the current debate on drug trafficking. The study concludes with a number of recommendations on how to reform the current drugs and drug trafficking strategies and programmes pursued by both regions and with other partners.

EU-Latin America relations :

Charting a course for the future, Report of the European Policy Summit
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
41 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Latin America and the European Union have great potential for future cooperation on a range of global challenges, participants told a conference co-organised by Friends of Europe and the Konrad Adenaur Stiftung. “Latin American countries are now largely dynamic democracies,” said Christian Leffler, Managing Director for the Americas at the European External Action Service. “This has allowed a strengthening of ties. The stock of EU investment in Brazil is bigger than EU investment in Russia and China together, and there is a long-standing relationship to build on.”

EU trade with Latin America and the Caribbean :

Overview and figures
Publisher: 
35 p.
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
This publication provides an overview of trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings. The EU has fully fledged agreements with two Latin American groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group), a multiparty trade agreement with three members of the Andean Community (Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru), and bilateral agreements with Chile and Mexico. Since November 2017, a new agreement governing trade relations with Cuba has also been provisionally applied. In addition, the EU is currently modernising its agreements with Mexico (with which it has reached an 'agreement in principle') and Chile. The EU also has framework agreements with Mercosur and its individual members (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). The agreement with the former will be replaced, once the ongoing negotiations on an EU-Mercosur association agreement have been completed. This publication provides recent data on trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings, compares the main agreements governing trade relations that are already in place, and analyses the rationale behind the ongoing negotiations on the EU-Mercosur, EU-Mexico and EU-Chile agreements. This is a revised and updated edition of a publication from October 2017 by Gisela Grieger and Roderick Harte, PE 608.793.

EU development cooperation with Latin America

Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Bruselas
Volume, number, page: 
12 p.
Abstract: 
EU development cooperation with Latin America is mainly conducted through the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) and its different geographical (regional, sub-regional and bilateral) and thematic programmes. Nevertheless, the 2014-2020 programming period has brought about the introduction of a new blending financial instrument for the region, the Latin American Investment Facility (LAIF), which combines EU grants with other resources. It has also seen the transition of most Latin American countries ...

Dealing with diversity The EU and Latin America today

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
n.145.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This Chaillot Paper examines the relationship between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). It contends that the original assumptions underpinning EU policy towards the region no longer apply, due to the erosion of the liberal consensus, as well as the ongoing obstacles to regional integration in LAC.
Highlighting the various shortcomings in this bi-regional relationship, the paper argues that focusing on bilateral relations between the EU and individual countries is the way to move forward today, as it is in this sphere that deeper and more concrete cooperation has been strongest. This is because this level of interaction is best suited to accommodate an increasingly diverse region.

Climate Finance Regional Briefing:

Latin America
Publisher: 
ODI
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
n.6.
Abstract: 
Latin America is a highly heterogeneous region, with differences in levels of economic development and social and indigenous history, both among and within countries. The impacts of climate change, in particular glacial melt and changes in river flows, extreme events and risks to food production systems affect development in both rural and urban areas in the region (World Bank, 2014). Climate finance in the Latin American region is highly concentrated, with a few of the largest countries in the region such as Brazil and Mexico receiving a large share of the funding. Mitigation activities receive more than eight times that of adaptation at USD 2.4 billion and USD 0.3 billion respectively. Since 2003, a total of USD 2.8 billion has been approved for 359 projects in the region.1 Of this amount, USD 1.8 billion is in the form of grants, while slightly over USD 1 billion is provided through concessional loans, largely through projects funded under the World Bank’s Climate
Investment Funds, implemented in the region by the Inter-American Development Bank. Only nine projects have been approved in Latin America by multilateral climate funds so far in 2016. Notably, these include three projects under the new Green Climate Fund, which is providing USD 112 million in loans and grants to support solar energy in Chile, energy efficiency investments in El Salvador and forest protection measures in Ecuador.

Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean:

policy options and research priorities
Publisher: 
Springer Open
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
24:14, pp.1-39.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Although climate change is filled with uncertainties, a broad set of policies proposed to address this issue can be grouped in two categories: mitigation and adaptation. Developed countries that are better prepared to cope with climate change have stressed the importance of mitigation, which ideally requires a global agreement that is still lacking. This paper uses a theoretical framework to argue that in the absence of a binding international agreement on mitigation, Latin America should focus mainly on adaptation to cope with the consequences of climate change. This is not a recommendation that such economies indulge in free-riding. Instead, it is based on cost–benefit considerations, all else being equal. Only in the presence of a global binding agreement can the region hope to exploit its comparative advantage in the conservation and management of forests, which are a large carbon sink. The decision of which policies to implement should depend on the results of a thorough cost–benefit analysis of competing projects, yet very little is known or has been carried out in this area to date. Research should be directed toward cost–benefit analysis of alternative climate change policies. Policymakers should compare other investments that are also pressing in the region, such as interventions to reduce water and air pollution, and determine which will render the greatest benefits.

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