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In-Depth Analysis

Proposal for the creation of an Observatory for Migration between the EU and Latinamerica and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Bruselas
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The creation of the Euro-Latin American Migration Observatory (EU-LAC-MO) responds to three pressing needs, specifically: databases of reliable and comparable empirical data; research into the causes and consequences of migration; and analysis of the policies developed by the institutions and their suitability for meeting the requirements. Based on the three key thematic areas of the structured dialogue (links between migration and
development; regular migration; and irregular migration), the functions of the Observatory would be as follows: 1) collation of existing databases and harmonisation of statistical methods; 2) dissemination of existing research and generation of new research to fill existing gaps; 3) analysis of public policy, dissemination of administrative manuals, identification of best practice and creation of performance indicators; and 4) application of international and regional legislation. The organisation could be part of the Euro-Latin American Foundation or of a body such as the IOM or SEGIB (Ibero-American General Secretariat). It should have an International Committee as its consultative and coordinating body, an Executive Committee
for operations and various national coordination branches. The funding for the Executive Committee could come from organisational budgets, from a trust fund or from a mixed system. The resources for projects and activities could be provided by international and national bodies or could come from international cooperation.

Human rights dialogue between the European Union and Central America

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
28 p.
Abstract: 
This report is a brief study of the political dialogue on human rights between the European Union and Central America and acts as a basis for the preparation of an own-initiative report by the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights. Political dialogue is today considered to be the European Union’s most important instrument for external action. It entails dialogue on equal terms that recognises the different situations of the parties involved and uses cooperation as a common working method.One result of this instrument is the development of relations with the Central American isthmus, based on the Framework Cooperation Agreement with Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua
and Panama, which was signed on 22 February 1993 and entered into force on 1 March 1999. The socalled San José Dialogue has also helped to contribute to the stability of these relations. The instability of the Central American region in past decades, caused by armed conflicts, has had a direct impact on the limited development of these nations. Nonetheless, and in spite of their terrible consequences, there is a social desire for change in the region, focusing on the improvement of living conditions in a peaceful context. Aware of the new development situation arising in the region, the European Union decided that it was appropriate to include Central America in its human development programmes, based on the promotion of democracy and human rights. This initiative gave rise to the Multiannual Programme for the Promotion of Democracy and Human Rights in Central America, which establishes different programmes for each country, and involves leaders and groups from civil society. By implementing these programmes the European Union is paving the way for comprehensive development among the actors involved. After analysing the above channels, this paper suggests a series of strategic recommendations to be considered as a preliminary analysis for the formulation of a framework strategy.

EU trade with Latin America and the Caribbean :

Overview and figures
Publisher: 
35 p.
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
This publication provides an overview of trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings. The EU has fully fledged agreements with two Latin American groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group), a multiparty trade agreement with three members of the Andean Community (Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru), and bilateral agreements with Chile and Mexico. Since November 2017, a new agreement governing trade relations with Cuba has also been provisionally applied. In addition, the EU is currently modernising its agreements with Mexico (with which it has reached an 'agreement in principle') and Chile. The EU also has framework agreements with Mercosur and its individual members (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). The agreement with the former will be replaced, once the ongoing negotiations on an EU-Mercosur association agreement have been completed. This publication provides recent data on trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings, compares the main agreements governing trade relations that are already in place, and analyses the rationale behind the ongoing negotiations on the EU-Mercosur, EU-Mexico and EU-Chile agreements. This is a revised and updated edition of a publication from October 2017 by Gisela Grieger and Roderick Harte, PE 608.793.
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