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European Union Institute for Security Studies

Citizens in an interconnected and polycentric world :

Global trends 2030
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
174 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The report identifies several global trends that will shape the world in 2030. They include: •• The empowerment of the individual, which may contribute to a growing sense of belonging to a single human community; •• Greater stress on sustainable development against a backdrop of greater resource scarcity and persistent poverty, compounded by the consequences of climate change; •• The emergence of a more polycentric world characterised by a shift of power away from states, and growing governance gaps as the mechanisms for inter-state relations fail to respond adequately to global public demands

Giving substance to the strategic partnerships :

Brazil
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
n.7, pp.75-77
Category: 
Abstract: 
The first ever EU-Brazil Summit took place in July 2007 in Lisbon, under the Portuguese presidency, after the European Commission recommended that a strategic partnership with Brazil should be launched. The strategic partnership between the EU and Brazil recognises Brazil as the European Union’s most important economic and political partner in Latin America, thus Brazil now occupies a prominent place among the EU’s select number of strategic partners.

Dealing with diversity The EU and Latin America today

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
n.145.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This Chaillot Paper examines the relationship between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). It contends that the original assumptions underpinning EU policy towards the region no longer apply, due to the erosion of the liberal consensus, as well as the ongoing obstacles to regional integration in LAC.
Highlighting the various shortcomings in this bi-regional relationship, the paper argues that focusing on bilateral relations between the EU and individual countries is the way to move forward today, as it is in this sphere that deeper and more concrete cooperation has been strongest. This is because this level of interaction is best suited to accommodate an increasingly diverse region.

The EU and the world: players and policies post-Lisbon

A handbook
The EU and the world: players and policies post-Lisbon
Publisher: 
European Union Institute for Security Studies
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
207 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The institutional context in which the European Union conducts its external action – starting with the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) – is complex, sometimes unclear, and highly fragmented. Moreover, the large number of players and formats for shaping, making and implementing decisions hardly facilitates a thorough understanding of the modus operandi of the Union in this domain. This volume is intended to offer interested readers a portrait of how the European Union conducts diplomacy – as well as defence, development and other related policies. It offers an overview of how the EU has evolved as a foreign policy actor especially since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, and includes analyses of the main players in the EU system and their interplay, conveying both past dynamics and present trends. The book examines both the broader institutional context (European Commission, Parliament and Council) and the specific CFSP/CSDP set-up (the ‘multi-hatted’ High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the European External Action Service and other bodies) with a view to highlighting the challenges and opportunities they create for Europe’s foreign policy. It also describes the policies that underpin the EU’s external action, as well as covering the geographical dimension and analysing the Union’s array of ‘strategic partnerships’ throughout the world.

zika

a crisis that bites
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
6, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
On 1 February, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the Zika virus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Are the health crisis management structures currently in place, not only in Latin America but also in the EU, ready to face this challenge?

Transatlantic drug trafficking

via Africa
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
3, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
The growing consumer market for illicit substances in Europe also poses challenges for West Africa. This Alert shows how its optimal geographical location is turning it into a hotbed for smuggling networks operating out of Latin America.

LAC’s insecure economies

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
4, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
With falling commodity prices, slowing Chinese growth and tightening financial conditions, the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have once again revealed their vulnerability to global headwinds – albeit to varying degrees. Dragged down by the faltering economies of Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela, the region has been experiencing economic deceleration for the past five years, with 2015 marking the first of overall regional contraction since 2009.

The economic impact of violence in LAC

implications for the EU
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
16, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the costs arising from violence outweigh the expenditure devoted to preventing or containing it. To help address this, the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) has developed a model that measures both overt and hidden expenditures. In this report for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), José Luengo-Cabrera suggests that the IEP model can serve as a benchmark for assessments of the cost-effectiveness of public security programmes, and inform decisions on optimising the levels of spending needed to contain violence. He also discusses the lessons of the model and its results for the EU.

EU-LAC

the other transatlantic partnership
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
8, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
This brief discusses the evolving nature of EU - Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) relations since the 1999 Rio summit. By evaluating the changing dynamics encountered internally and externally by both the EU and LAC countries, the author maps out the main issues which will be addressed at the EU-CELAC summit in Brussels in June 2015.

Low carbon development in Latin America

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
15, 2017.
Abstract: 
In Latin America, the high economic dynamism experienced at the beginning of the 21st century reduced poverty, but also led to the creation of negative externalities such as increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions responsible for climate change. Latin America’s current development paradigm relies on extractive industries (mining, oil, gas, and timber) and the expansion of agribusiness activities. Yet this model is inconsistent with the low carbon development path outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement, and jeopardises Latin America’s economic, energy, and climate security.
Latin American countries share a number of features that are relevant to the transition to low carbon development. A low carbon set of policies in the region is fundamental for protecting the environment, fighting climate change, attracting foreign investments, re-organising the region’s economies, and creating new opportunities for social development.

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