Choose your language:

European Parliament

The trade chapter of the European Union association agreement with Central America

Study
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
65 p.
Abstract: 
The EU Central America Association Agreement is an example of the successful completion of a region-to-region agreement and therefore in line with the EU’s aim of promoting regional integration in other regions through trade and association agreements.
For the EU, economic welfare gains and employment effects from the trade chapter of the Agreement are because of the relative small size of the Central American market expected to be negligible. However, EU exporters will benefit from lower tariffs on manufactured goods especially in automobiles. For the Central American countries (CA), there is the potential of significant gains, but these are not evenly spread. The fact that
CA exporters already benefited from zero tariffs on almost all exports to the EU under the extended Generalised System of Preferences (GSP+) means that there are relatively few sectors that will have enhanced access with the exception of bananas, raw cane sugar and shrimps. Above all, the Agreement will provide legally secure access to the EU market. The Agreement also tackles cross border services and establishment, technical
barriers to trade (TBT), sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) issues as well as trade remedies in the shape of anti-dumping, countervailing duties or multilateral safeguards. The provisions on intellectual property rights include Geographic Indications (GIs). The trade chapter furthermore contains a human rights clause which stipulates that the parties must ensure that human rights are respected within their jurisdiction. Furthermore there
are provisions on sustainable development.

Proposal for the creation of an Observatory for Migration between the EU and Latinamerica and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Bruselas
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The creation of the Euro-Latin American Migration Observatory (EU-LAC-MO) responds to three pressing needs, specifically: databases of reliable and comparable empirical data; research into the causes and consequences of migration; and analysis of the policies developed by the institutions and their suitability for meeting the requirements. Based on the three key thematic areas of the structured dialogue (links between migration and
development; regular migration; and irregular migration), the functions of the Observatory would be as follows: 1) collation of existing databases and harmonisation of statistical methods; 2) dissemination of existing research and generation of new research to fill existing gaps; 3) analysis of public policy, dissemination of administrative manuals, identification of best practice and creation of performance indicators; and 4) application of international and regional legislation. The organisation could be part of the Euro-Latin American Foundation or of a body such as the IOM or SEGIB (Ibero-American General Secretariat). It should have an International Committee as its consultative and coordinating body, an Executive Committee
for operations and various national coordination branches. The funding for the Executive Committee could come from organisational budgets, from a trust fund or from a mixed system. The resources for projects and activities could be provided by international and national bodies or could come from international cooperation.

Modernising EU-Chile trade relations

City: 
Brussels
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Currently, EU-Chile relations are governed by the 2002 EU-Chile Association Agreement (AA). The EU would like to modernise the AA's trade pillar to keep pace with new global trade patterns and the ambitious provisions of more recent trade agreements. During the September plenary, the European Parliament is expected to adopt recommendations on the future negotiations on this modernisation. It is also asked to give its consent to the conclusion of a separate EU-Chile agreement on trade in organic products and the AA's third additional protocol to take account of Croatia's EU accession.

Mexico :

Economic indicators and trade with EU
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Mexico's economy is the 15th largest in the world (in terms of GDP) and the second largest in Latin America, after Brazil. It is currently classified as an upper middle-income economy by the World Bank, and is a member of the WTO, the OECD and the G20. The EU is Mexico's third-largest trading partner after the US and China, and its second biggest export market after the US. Our infographic, produced in close cooperation with GlobalStat, provides a quick and useful overview of Mexico's main economic ...

International cooperation in Latin America

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Abstract: 
Latin America has a complex network of international organisations, some covering the whole area (ALADI), some the South American (UNASUR) or Central American (SICA) regions, and some particular sub-regions (Mercosur, CAN). The Pacific Alliance is especially oriented towards other areas of the world (Asia-Pacific). Some are more focused on trade (Mercosur, Pacific Alliance) and others on non-trade political aspects (UNASUR). (Caribbean organisations and other less structured forms of cooperation in the region are not covered here).

EU-Cuba relations :

a new chapter begins
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
31 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement (PDCA) between the EU and Cuba, endorsed by the European Parliament (EP) on 5 July 2017, opens a new phase in EU-Cuba relations. Until now Cuba was the only country in Latin America without a cooperation or political dialogue agreement with the EU. The PDCA creates a framework for political dialogue and closer bilateral cooperation, including in trade. The parts of the agreement (mostly related to cooperation and trade issues) that fall within EU competence can already be applied provisionally, but the agreement will only enter into force in full after it has been ratified in all the EU Member States.
Since negotiations on the PDCA began in 2014, Cuba’s relations with the EU and individual Member States have intensified considerably. For the EU, the PDCA is a tool for supporting a process of change and modernisation in Cuba, while for Cuba it represents the ‘normalisation’ of the relationship with an important economic and trade partner and helps it to diversify its external relations.
Parliament will focus, in monitoring the implementation of the PDCA, on two areas of particular concern to the EP: human rights and civil liberties on Cuba, and the role of Cuban civil society.

Implementation of Colombia's peace agreement

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
In the year since the signature of the new final peace agreement on 24 November 2016, the peace process in Colombia has not progressed smoothly. Although the disarmament of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and its transformation into a political party, as well as the reduction in violence associated with the conflict, have been a success, aspects such as reintegrating FARC members into civilian life, legal implementation, and rural reform are lagging behind. This is likely to influence the country's presidential and legislative elections due to be held in 2018.

Human rights provisions in Economic Partnership Agreements in light of the expiry of the Cotonou Agreement in 2020

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
45 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The study considers the options for suspending obligations under the EU-ACP Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) in connection with violations of human rights, democratic principles or the rule of law following the expiry of the Cotonou Agreement in 2020. It outlines the functioning of the human rights clause in the Cotonou Agreement, before considering the possibilities for suspending the EPAs under their own provisions, or for other reasons in international law, such as countermeasures. Next, it discusses how any post-2020 arrangements can best continue the existing mechanisms for human rights conditionality set out in the Cotonou Agreement. In connection with this, this study proposes certain suggestions for improving future versions of human rights clauses, and considers whether there are legal obstacles to the invocation of this clause under general international law, principally under WTO law. The study concludes with a set of
comments and recommendations.

Human rights dialogue between the European Union and Central America

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
28 p.
Abstract: 
This report is a brief study of the political dialogue on human rights between the European Union and Central America and acts as a basis for the preparation of an own-initiative report by the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights. Political dialogue is today considered to be the European Union’s most important instrument for external action. It entails dialogue on equal terms that recognises the different situations of the parties involved and uses cooperation as a common working method.One result of this instrument is the development of relations with the Central American isthmus, based on the Framework Cooperation Agreement with Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua
and Panama, which was signed on 22 February 1993 and entered into force on 1 March 1999. The socalled San José Dialogue has also helped to contribute to the stability of these relations. The instability of the Central American region in past decades, caused by armed conflicts, has had a direct impact on the limited development of these nations. Nonetheless, and in spite of their terrible consequences, there is a social desire for change in the region, focusing on the improvement of living conditions in a peaceful context. Aware of the new development situation arising in the region, the European Union decided that it was appropriate to include Central America in its human development programmes, based on the promotion of democracy and human rights. This initiative gave rise to the Multiannual Programme for the Promotion of Democracy and Human Rights in Central America, which establishes different programmes for each country, and involves leaders and groups from civil society. By implementing these programmes the European Union is paving the way for comprehensive development among the actors involved. After analysing the above channels, this paper suggests a series of strategic recommendations to be considered as a preliminary analysis for the formulation of a framework strategy.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - European Parliament