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Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

Trade and development nexus :

reflections on the performance of trade in goods under the CARIFORUM-European Union Partnership Agreement A CARIFORUM perspective
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
54 p.
Abstract: 
Given the asymmetry in the levels of development and capacity which exist between the EU and CARIFORUM States, the architects of the CARIFORUM-European Union (EU) Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) anticipated the need for review and monitoring of the impacts of
implementation. Article 5 and other provisions in the Agreement therefore specifically mandate that monitoring be undertaken to ensure that the Agreement benefits a wide cross-section of the population in member countries.The paper seeks to provide a preliminary assessment of the impact of the EPA on CARIFORUM countries. In so doing, it highlights some critical information and implementation gaps and challenges that have emerged during the implementation process. The analysis however, is restricted to goods trade. The services sector will be the subject of a separate report.
The paper draws on a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses. While the paper undertakes a CARIFORUM-wide analysis for the most part, five CARIFORUM member states including Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Saint Lucia are examined more closely in some instances. These economies were selected by virtue of economic structure and development constraints, as a representative subset of CARIFORUM, which comprises the CARICOM membership as well as the Dominican Republic.

Quantitative assessment of a free trade agreement between MERCOSUR and the European Union

Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The main purpose of this paper is to analyse the direct and indirect impacts of an FTA (free trade agreement) between MERCOSUR and the
EU (European Union). MERCOSUR is a regional trade agreement between Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay, created in 1991. Venezuela signed a membership agreement in 2006, but it has not yet been ratified by the Brazilian and Paraguayan parliaments. In our study, we consider that Venezuela is not part of MERCOSUR. The aim of this regional treaty is to support free trade and the free movement of goods, people and currency. By European Union, we mean the 27 countries which are linked by their belonging to the European Communities

First Europe-Latin America Dialogue on Promotion of Energy Efficiency

(Brussels, Belgium, 28-30 October 1998)
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
82 p.
Abstract: 
This report contains a recap of the presentations given by the speakers at the “First Europe-Latin America Dialogue on Promotion of Energy Efficiency”, held in Brussels from 28 to 30 October 1998. The event was organized within the framework of the “Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Latin America” Project, which is cofinanced by ECLAC, through its Natural Resources and Infrastructure Division, and the SYNERGY Programme of the European Commission’s XVII Directorate-General of Energy. The project is under the direction of Fernando Sánchez Albavera, ECLAC Regional Adviser on Mining and Energy, and François Casana, head of the European Commission’s SYNERGY Programme.

Euro and the financial relations between Latin America and Europe :

medium- and long-term implications
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
71 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The internationalisation of the euro is in its initial stages and it is still difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding its scope and its implications for Latin America. Indeed, the emergence of an internationally used currency is slow and subject to inertial forces. Nonetheless, several fairly robust conclusions can be inferred from the results of the document. The most plausible medium- to long-term international scenario seems to be development of an asymmetrical duopoly between the euro and the dollar. In a context of scant international monetary cooperation, this scenario could lead to high volatility between the two main international currencies, which will be a powerful destabilising factor for third countries. In terms of official international reserves, the growing financial use of the single European currency and the development of Euroland capital markets should lead to greater diversification in favour of the euro in the medium and long term. Together with other factors, the growth of the euro bond market will tend to increase the pressure to widen and deepen the euro financial market and make it more liquid. This should favour the development of better conditions for both European and third-country participants. The geographic diversification strategy implemented by the European banks, and the boom in European foreign direct investment could also favour greater international use of the euro. For Latin America, the sustained increase in the share of euro-denominated international bond issues, chiefly by the public sector, makes it necessary to consider policies for managing the currency composition of the external debt. On the other hand, the medium- to long-term consequences of an increasingly bipolar but asymmetrical international monetary system will have to be included in the Latin America national exchange rate policies, enhancing the possibility of adopting anchor baskets.

Building SME competitiveness in the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean

policy proposals by the private sector
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
38 p.
Abstract: 
SMEs as economic agents are being called upon to play a new and important role in boosting relations between Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union (see box 2). These two regions are closely linked from the economic viewpoint, in particular through trade and direct investment as well as through the long-standing exchange of people and ideas. Today, the growth of Latin America and the Caribbean can be a factor for mitigating the impact of the crisis in Europe. The internationalization of SMEs, beyond helping to generate employment and increase incomes, offers the possibility of adding value at origin and introducing improvements in production which will boost the market share of such firms, promoting more vigorous entrepreneurship. To this end it is essential for them to reduce productivity gaps by incorporating technology, innovations and knowledge into products, as well as to foster management improvements.

Latin America - European Union cooperation

a partnership for development
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
145 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union has taken special interest in promoting development cooperation as an instrument along with framework and association agreements. Today, the countries making up the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) are in a far different position from the one envisaged in the early 1990s.
Nearly 15 years on from the launch of the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribberan States (CELAC, formerly the Rio Group), it is important to look at the future prospects for cooperation. During this change, the strategic partnership between the European Union and CELAC will continue, so European Union cooperation must also change to meet this challenge.
Summary .-- I. Official development assistance from the European Union in the global context .-- II. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013 .-- III. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013, from commitment
to execution .-- IV. European Union cooperation 2014-2020 .-- V. Conclusions.

The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
109 p.
Abstract: 
This document analyses the aforementioned changes in four chapters that compare and contrast the realities of the two regions. After this introduction, chapter I analyses the new consensus represented by the signing of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals. Chapter II looks at the situation in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union in relation to global economic conditions, considering macroeconomic, trade and foreign direct investment matters, as well as production and industry. Chapter III reviews progress on the social front in the two regions. Chapter IV considers the position of the European Union and CELAC in relation to the new vectors of change, basically the digital economy and climate change. Lastly, chapter V offers some final considerations.

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