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Violence

Honduras as a Complex Adaptive System and What It Means for the European Union

The Case of Violence
Publisher: 
GIGA
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
n.294
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This paper assesses why the various initiatives undertaken by the European Union in Honduras have not had the desired impact of reducing the extraordinary levels of violence in the country. The hypothesis put forward is that the EU’s approach to the issue of violence has been unsuccessful because it does not match the complexity of the problem encountered.
As an alternative, the paper puts forward complexity and human systems dynamics as conceptual frameworks for reinterpreting the issue of violence. It shows that violence is one of the results of an incoherent process of self‐organisation which marks Honduras and suggests ways of influencing the conditions that make up this pattern in order to address the problem of violence. It also outlines what this new approach would mean for the actions and policies proposed and implemented by the European Union.

EU security cooperation with Latin America :

A priority requiring consolidation
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
12 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Although security cooperation is not yet a well-consolidated priority for the EU in its relations with Latin America, it has acquired increasing importance with the explicit inclusion of citizen security as a new priority area in the 2015 EU-CELAC action plan. The main current areas of EU security-related cooperation with the region are the fight against drugs; violence prevention; conflict resolution in Colombia, with an EU stake in its peace process; and the participation of some Latin American countries in EU crisis-management operations in the framework of the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy. This is achieved through trans-regional, regional, sub-regional and bilateral programmes and projects, as well as through the conclusion of framework agreements with certain Latin American countries. The European Parliament is particularly involved in promoting security cooperation with the region, as evidenced by its support for a Euro-Latin American Charter for Peace and Security, in the framework of the Euro-Latin American Parliamentary Assembly, and the adoption of specific resolutions on the subject.

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
36 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Sexual violence against minors is a major problem in Latin America. Children are mostly at risk in their own homes, while adolescents are at risk in their homes but also in the wider community (for instance, schools or boyfriends). However, data is very limited due to silence around the issue. Latin America is highly patriarchal, is riven by inequalities within and between social groups, and has weak judicial institutions; these are all factors that impact on gender based violence. However, governments in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, and Paraguay are starting to see children as individuals with rights, rather than minors under the sole authority of fathers, and are designing laws and agencies to protect those rights. Civil society in the meantime is increasingly mobilising against violence against women, including violence against girls, two forms of violence that go hand in hand, at a time when the problem is increasingly recognised and acted upon globally. This report outlines possibilities for the EU to support these recent developments and initiatives to end violence against minors via the establishment of national action plans, in collaboration with national, regional and global partners.

The economic impact of violence in LAC

implications for the EU
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
16, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the costs arising from violence outweigh the expenditure devoted to preventing or containing it. To help address this, the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) has developed a model that measures both overt and hidden expenditures. In this report for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), José Luengo-Cabrera suggests that the IEP model can serve as a benchmark for assessments of the cost-effectiveness of public security programmes, and inform decisions on optimising the levels of spending needed to contain violence. He also discusses the lessons of the model and its results for the EU.

Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon

from Madrid to Santiago.
Publisher: 
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
The purpose of this publication, the third in the series “Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon”, is to identify the content to be included in this new space for bi-regional dialogue on gender issues with regard to violence against women and the importance of the participation of defenders of women’s rights in this area.
Taken from articles written by prominent defenders of women’s rights, academicians and representatives of civil society, this third publication focuses mainly on legal aspects and legislation. It aims to make headway in the debate on the need for effective legal frameworks, as well as in other related
issues such as statistical records and action protocols, not forgetting the need for comprehensive government polices to eradicate violence against women. These are numerous challenges that require a firm commitment from the states, from the EU and CELAC, just as civil society demands.
he novelty of this third publication is that in addition to articles on Latin American countries such as Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, El Salvador, Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, it also includes articles on European countries like Italy and Spain, highlighting the magnitude and global nature of this
phenomenon. Organisations from both continents have therefore joined forces to request an effective, efficient response to this serious violation of human rights: violence against women and its most extreme manifestation, feminicide or femicide.

Citizen security in Latin America.

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
14 mayo, 201, pp.1-2.
Abstract: 
This Alert explains why the reduction of lethal violence and other forms of victimisation is a precondition for ensuring inclusive and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).
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