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Trade integration

The Caribbean in the European Union-Community of Latin American and Caribbean States Partnership

The Caribbean in the European Union-Community of Latin American and Caribbean States Partnership
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
125 p.
Abstract: 
Historically, the relationship between Latin America and the Anglophone Caribbean had been termed “distant”. Although the warming of relations started several decades before, the 1990s – the post-Cold War era – saw an intensification of engagement, fuelled by the imperatives of globalisation and the need for collaboration in an increasingly interdependent world. The strongest indication of the two sub-regions’ commitment to collaboration thus far was the establishment of CELAC in 2011.
In 2013, CELAC became the organism through which the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region relates to the European Union (EU) in a strategic partnership, established between the two parties since 1999. A strengthened CELAC is therefore necessary for enhancing the Bi-regional Partnership. Some of CELAC’s objectives are to promote regional integration, strengthen regional unity, and develop ties of solidarity and cooperation among LAC countries. The aim of this study revolves around achieving the above objectives, which inform the main research question: how can the participation of the Caribbean in CELAC be strengthened in order to boost CELAC and the Bi-regional Strategic Partnership? The Caribbean, in the case of the study is defined as CARIFORUM. However, we note that challenges of relationsbetween the Caribbean and Latin America are being experienced predominantly by CARICOM states, the non – Latin members of the Caribbean sub-grouping. As the Caribbean relates to the EU in the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) group, the study also examines the ACP-EU relationship vis-à-vis the Caribbean’s engagement in CELAC and the Bi-regional Strategic Partnership.
Based on the work of Sandler (2010), the study adopts the view that the Caribbean’s participation in CELAC is likely to be enhanced and sustained on the basis of the challenges that it shares with Latin America, and proposes the following areas for collaboration: poverty and inequality,crime and security, food security, non-communicable diseases, financial vulnerability and governance and transparency.

L'ampliació de la Unió Europea

els efectes a l'Amèrica Llatina
Publisher: 
INEHCA
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
9:31, pp.67-85
Abstract: 
With the accession of ten new countries on May 1, 2004, the European Union completed its largest ever extension. With the current 25 members, the EU is consolidated as one of the biggest markets in the world and, as is logical, this new reality entails political and economic upheavals. The author shows how this process has aroused an incipient fear among EU partners in Latin America due to this greater interest shown in the Eastern European countries. Countries whose economy is based on agriculture and livestock, such as Argentina, fear that the new agrarian markets (particularly Poland) may affect their trade dealings with the EU. Nevertheless, for the moment, events have allayed these fears. Be that as it may, the author feels that it is imperative that the traditional relations between European and Latin America continue to be strengthened, based on a certain scale of shared values, as the only way to make progress in the strategic cooperation of the two partners, and thus bring greater stability and democracy to an increasingly more globalised world.

Central American Economic Integration

An Introduction to the Study of Customs Union and Relations with the European Union
Publisher: 
UCM
City: 
Madrid
Volume, number, page: 
45 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This Working Paper focuses on the characteristics and challenges of the process of economic integration in Central America and it analyses the situation and alternatives of the existing customs union in the region. It also refers to the external relations of Central America, in particular with the European Union (EU), the USA (CAFTA) and Mexico (Plan Puebla Panama). In order to extend the analytical scope, Central American relations with the EU have been considered in the general context of the relations between Latin America and the EU (Group of Rio Dialogue).
The Paper emphasizes the importance of strengthening economic integration and improving external relations of Central American countries. For this reasons, I suggest to establish a common budget in the region, with a revenue system based on national contributions and on the customs union incomes and an expenditure mechanism able to carry out structural projects. A common budget will reinforce the existing process of
integration, will contribute to the improvement of the international insertion of Central American countries and will boost economic social development in the region.

Beyond the Recovery

Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Trade and Integration Monitor : Beyond the Recovery: Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Publisher: 
IDB
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
566, 111 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The Trade and Integration Monitor 2017 analyzes the current trade recovery and assesses the capacity of the region to compete in global markets. It argues that, having overcome the longest trade contraction in recent history, Latin American and Caribbean countries face a trade outlook substantially less favorable than the one prevailing before the crisis. The end of the commodity price super cycle signals the urgent need for policies aimed at boosting competitiveness and at taking advantage of the opportunities provided by disruptive technologies such as e-commerce. - See more at: https://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/8642#sthash.zwColfIU.dpuf

Cluster Report

Trade Integration in Latin America and the Caribbean
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
17/66, pp.1-55.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This cluster report takes stock of and explores opportunities for trade integration in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Drawing on a set of 12 analytical studies that will be issued as working papers, the report examines the determinants of trade, explores the potential to enhance LAC’s trade integration, and assesses the associated economic and social effects. To deepen understanding of the region’s policy options and trade strategies, the report also incorporates the views of LAC country authorities based on responses to a survey. This provides an opportunity to examine the alignment of recommendations based on the analytical findings with the region’s current trade policy priorities, with the caveat that the survey was conducted between late 2015 and mid-2016, prior to the most recent developments in the global trade landscape.
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