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Sustainability

The Role of Alliances in International Climate Policy after Paris

Publisher: 
FES
City: 
Berlin
Volume, number, page: 
10 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The High Ambition Coalition, comprising over 90 countries, which came to public attention shortly before the end of the Paris climate conference, made a substantial contribution to the successful adoption of the Paris Agreement. Besides its astute conduct of the negotiations and skilfully stage-managed media performance the Alliance owed its success above all to its broad composition, made up of industrialised, emerging and developing countries. Thus alliance formation once again proved to be an effective instrument for achieving climate-policy aims in difficult negotiating situations.
While the climate-policy focus up until Paris was mainly on the negotiation process, the focus post-Paris has shifted to implementation of the Agreement. A number of new challenges are tied in with this, coping with which will require the participation of a broad spectrum of actors from politics, business, finance and civil society. Alliances will also have to become more diversified.
The future belongs not only to the existing alliances, whose further development remains open, but above all to multi-stakeholder alliances of various kinds. As pioneers of change they can make a decisive contribution to advancing the transformation process at national, regional and international levels, to the extent they are able to mobilise the necessary popular and political support.

Beyond 2015: Perspectives and Proposals for Development Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
134 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) share a long history of political dialogue and bi-regional cooperation in which development has always played a key role. Both regions also share a commitment to multilateralism and cooperation and have collaborated at the regional and global level towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by September 2015.

In 2015, both regions will need to work jointly to determine new goals and targets for sustainable development in the post-2015 framework. This will raise considerable challenges for development cooperation between these two regions as well as for cooperation with other countries and regions. Given the changes that have occurred since the establishment of the MDG both within the two regions and on a global scale, the present situation as well as the capacities, responsibilities and aspirations of both regions within a post-MDG context need to be analysed. Both regions have to understand how global and regional developments have affected their strategic partnership and and how they can cooperate so as to effectively shape the new global governance of development.

Based on an agreement with the UE-LAC Foundation, this study aims to address two major objectives: firstly, the study examines the new framework for post-2015 cooperation and the agenda for the sustainable Development Golas (SDG), taking into account the new priorities established by the multilateral framework, the bi-regional relation and the new EU framework of cooperation for development initiated with the “Agenda for change”.

Secondly, the study aims to analyse the roles of the EU and LAC within this new framework based on their Strategic Partnership and the inter-governmental EU-CELAC process and to identify how the two regions could continue to cooperate within this context.

In order to work towards these objectives the Complutense Institute of international Studies (ICEI) of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Chair of International and Ibero-American Cooperation of the University of Cantabria (COIBA) have collaborated in organising a multidisciplinary team of specialists from both regions. Its members include as joint directors and researchers, professors José Antonio Sanahuja (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) and Sergio Tezanos Vázquez (University of Cantabria, Spain), and as researchers, professors Alejandra Kern (San Martin University, Argentina) and Daniela Perrotta (Buenos Aires University), Jorge Hernández Moreno, Fiorella Werniche and Débora Fagaburru have collaborated as research assistants on this project.

Germany–Latin America :

Fostering Strategic Alliances for a Global Energy Transition
Publisher: 
KAS-Peru
City: 
Lima
Volume, number, page: 
5p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Latin America is of strategic importance for Germany’s international sustainable energy policies. Sustainable energy technologies not only have a large potential market in Latin America but also offer opportunities to address some of the region’s pressing issues. Moreover, Latin America offers interesting learning opportunities. In several Latin American countries, electricity supply has traditionally been based on renewable energies – namely hydropower. In some Latin American countries, bioenergy has become an important pillar of electricity and fuel supply. New renewable energy technologies such as wind and solar energy have recently gained ground. However, the region also has large oil and gas reserves. With growing energy demand, the expansion of new renewable energies goes hand in hand with rising demand for conventional energy. Moreover, Latin America is a strong voice in global efforts to mitigate climate change. The region is exposed to some of the most severe effects of climate change in the form of droughts, glacial retreat and rising sea levels. Droughts increasingly pose an energy security challenge in Latin American countries that are highly reliant on hydropower. Three Latin American countries are of particular relevance for German efforts to build alliances for a global energy transition: Germany has established bilateral energy partnerships with the regional heavyweights Brazil and Mexico, while Argentina has taken over the G20 presidency from Germany in 2018 and will thus play a central role in shaping the global energy agenda throughout its presidency.

The environment as a strategic priority in the European Union–Brazil partnership

is the EU behaving as a normative power or soft imperialist?
Publisher: 
Springer
City: 
Berlin
Volume, number, page: 
14:1, pp.47-64
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
In 2007, Brazil entered the European Union’s (EU) list of strategic partners; a token of recognition of the place Brazil occupies in current global affairs. Although promoting bilateral environmental convergence is a stated priority, cooperation between the EU and Brazil in this policy field is largely under-researched, raising interesting questions as to whether the current state of play could support EU claims for the normative orientation of its external environmental policy. Through an analysis of partnership activities in the fields of deforestation and biofuels, we suggest that while normative intentions may be regarded as a motivating force, critically viewing EU foreign environmental policy through a ‘soft imperialism’ lens could offer a more holistic understanding of the current state of bilateral cooperation. While the normative power thesis can be substantiated with regard to deforestation, we argue that by erecting barriers to shield its domestic biofuels production, the EU is placing trade competitiveness and economic growth above its normative aspirations. Subsequently, the partial adoption of sustainable development as an EU norm leads to policy incoherence and contradictory actions.

The EU-Brazil strategic partnership and the United Nations Climate Change Conferences: media diplomacy from Durban to Lima

Publisher: 
IRI
City: 
Brasilia
Volume, number, page: 
v.17, pp.1-17
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The European Union-Brazil Strategic Partnership highlights collaboration in the fight against climate change. The aim of this paper is to analyse whether there has been coordination or, at least, a convergence of positions of the EU and Brazil in the last four United Nations Climate Change Conferences (2011-2014). To this aim, there is a review of academic and official sources and an empirical analysis of the media diplomacy messages of both actors at the four conferences which are object of study.

The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
109 p.
Abstract: 
This document analyses the aforementioned changes in four chapters that compare and contrast the realities of the two regions. After this introduction, chapter I analyses the new consensus represented by the signing of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals. Chapter II looks at the situation in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union in relation to global economic conditions, considering macroeconomic, trade and foreign direct investment matters, as well as production and industry. Chapter III reviews progress on the social front in the two regions. Chapter IV considers the position of the European Union and CELAC in relation to the new vectors of change, basically the digital economy and climate change. Lastly, chapter V offers some final considerations.

Eco-innovation – a new paradigm for latin america

Publisher: 
Centro Universitário Feevale
City: 
Novo Hamburgo
Volume, number, page: 
12:1, pp. 148-159
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Global phenomena of climate change on the one hand and not predictable technological risks of energy supply on the other hand are challenging not only Germany and the European Union but society, politics, science and industry worldwide. The answers to these challenges are very different. Some countries are screening their existing energy concepts and are searching ways of alternative energy, such as legislation on clean technologies, so-called eco-innovation. It is especially this shift to eco—innovation that catches our attention. It is not reserved for energy technologies, ustainable production can also be meant in other industries, such as textile. But in the ongoing of the energy turn policies promoting renewable energies increasingly subsumed the concept (COO KE 2010). In the last decades energy policy lived a process of securitization. The connotation of energy policy with the field of security policy automatically led to a change of steering with rather hierarchical modes of governance. The shift towards innovation policy therefore means not also a reorientation of concepts but also a shift of governance towards multi-levelgovernance
(KERN; BULKELEY, 2009) – so far the debate in Europe. How is this concept discussed in Latin America? While the shift towards renewable energy is a quite new debate for Europe, Brazil had already a share of 58,4% of renewables on total energy production in 1970 (MAIHOLD; MÜLLER, 2012). Nevertheless compliance to renewable energy not always meant sustainable innovation. How is the concept of ecoinnovation discussed in Latin America? And how far can we observe the above described shift? In order to shed first insight on these questions we analyze the innovation plans of Argentine, Brazil and Mexico with focus on the link between ecology, innovation and renewable energies. We use the software Atlas.ti to research the plans with a co-occurrence analysis.

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