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Poverty

Migration and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Publisher: 
ODI
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
133 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Migration is one of the defining features of the 21st century. It contributes significantly to all aspects of economic and social development everywhere, and as such will be key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
But migration can also negatively impact development, and though the relationship between the two is increasingly recognised, it remains under-explored. We must ensure migration contributes to positive development outcomes and, ultimately, to realising the Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (the ‘2030 Agenda’). To do this, we need to understand the impact of migration on the achievement of all SDGs, and – equally – the impact this achievement will have on future migration patterns.
Here we collate, and draw out key findings from, a series of twelve ODI policy briefings which analyse the interrelationship between migration and key development areas. Each briefing explores how the links between migration and these different development issues affect the achievement of the SDGs, and offers pragmatic recommendations to incorporate migration into the 2030 Agenda to ensure it contributes to positive development outcomes.

Citizens in an interconnected and polycentric world :

Global trends 2030
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
174 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The report identifies several global trends that will shape the world in 2030. They include: •• The empowerment of the individual, which may contribute to a growing sense of belonging to a single human community; •• Greater stress on sustainable development against a backdrop of greater resource scarcity and persistent poverty, compounded by the consequences of climate change; •• The emergence of a more polycentric world characterised by a shift of power away from states, and growing governance gaps as the mechanisms for inter-state relations fail to respond adequately to global public demands

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

EU-Central American Association Agreement

European Parliament resolution on 11 December 2012 on the draft Council decision on the conclusion of the Agreement establishing an Association between the EU and its Member States, on the one hand, and Central America, on the other
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
P7_TA(2012)0478

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