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International environmental policy

The Role of Alliances in International Climate Policy after Paris

Publisher: 
FES
City: 
Berlin
Volume, number, page: 
10 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The High Ambition Coalition, comprising over 90 countries, which came to public attention shortly before the end of the Paris climate conference, made a substantial contribution to the successful adoption of the Paris Agreement. Besides its astute conduct of the negotiations and skilfully stage-managed media performance the Alliance owed its success above all to its broad composition, made up of industrialised, emerging and developing countries. Thus alliance formation once again proved to be an effective instrument for achieving climate-policy aims in difficult negotiating situations.
While the climate-policy focus up until Paris was mainly on the negotiation process, the focus post-Paris has shifted to implementation of the Agreement. A number of new challenges are tied in with this, coping with which will require the participation of a broad spectrum of actors from politics, business, finance and civil society. Alliances will also have to become more diversified.
The future belongs not only to the existing alliances, whose further development remains open, but above all to multi-stakeholder alliances of various kinds. As pioneers of change they can make a decisive contribution to advancing the transformation process at national, regional and international levels, to the extent they are able to mobilise the necessary popular and political support.

The EU-Brazil strategic partnership and the United Nations Climate Change Conferences: media diplomacy from Durban to Lima

Publisher: 
IRI
City: 
Brasilia
Volume, number, page: 
v.17, pp.1-17
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The European Union-Brazil Strategic Partnership highlights collaboration in the fight against climate change. The aim of this paper is to analyse whether there has been coordination or, at least, a convergence of positions of the EU and Brazil in the last four United Nations Climate Change Conferences (2011-2014). To this aim, there is a review of academic and official sources and an empirical analysis of the media diplomacy messages of both actors at the four conferences which are object of study.

The Impact of Labour Rights Commitments in EU Trade Agreements

The Case of Peru
Publisher: 
Cogitatio Press
City: 
Lisbon
Volume, number, page: 
5:4, pp.6-18.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
While the inclusion of labour rights in European Union (EU) trade agreements has become an ‘unobjectionable norm’, analyses of their impact have been largely absent from the literature. This article aims to partly fill this gap in existing research by examining the impact of labour rights commitments in the EU–Peru–Colombia agreement, with particular reference to the agricultural sector in Peru. Following a brief background overview of labour rights in agriculture in Peru, we draw up the analytical framework for assessing the impact of these commitments. We discern three distinctive legal commitments and find that they are flexible and conservative, also compared to provisions in other EU trade agreements. Subsequently, we assess the impact of these commitments by analysing to what extent they are being upheld in practice. Empirical evidence from several sources, including field research, shows that the Peruvian government has failed to implement the labour rights commitments in several respects. In the conclusions, we point to the cautious role of the EU, which has scope to monitor Peru’s labour rights compliance more proactively.

The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
109 p.
Abstract: 
This document analyses the aforementioned changes in four chapters that compare and contrast the realities of the two regions. After this introduction, chapter I analyses the new consensus represented by the signing of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals. Chapter II looks at the situation in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union in relation to global economic conditions, considering macroeconomic, trade and foreign direct investment matters, as well as production and industry. Chapter III reviews progress on the social front in the two regions. Chapter IV considers the position of the European Union and CELAC in relation to the new vectors of change, basically the digital economy and climate change. Lastly, chapter V offers some final considerations.

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.
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