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International economy

There Is No Reciprocity Latin America and Europe :

Unequal Entanglements
Publisher: 
International Research Network on Interdependent Inequalities in Latin America
City: 
Berlin
Volume, number, page: 
n.91, pp.1-22
Category: 
Abstract: 
This paper presents the transformations of Latin American-European relations over time as an interdependent unequal relationship. These relations have been shaped by exports of commodities, including the enrichment of European foodways with indigenous Latin American crops and the environmentally destructive extraction of natural resources and commercial export agriculture. The transformation under colonialism led not only to the settlement of Europeans in Latin America but also to the Atlantic slave trade. The consequence of these relations of domination even today is a limited acknowledgement of Latin America as being more than an extension of Europe. With the end of European immigration to and from Latin America, the role of the United States has grown instead, and increasingly developments in Latin America have also taken on their own dynamics, decoupled from Europe. In the coming decades, relations with China which have grown rapidly in commerce and commodity exports are likely to transform the role of Europe in the region yet again.

Citizens in an interconnected and polycentric world :

Global trends 2030
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
174 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The report identifies several global trends that will shape the world in 2030. They include: •• The empowerment of the individual, which may contribute to a growing sense of belonging to a single human community; •• Greater stress on sustainable development against a backdrop of greater resource scarcity and persistent poverty, compounded by the consequences of climate change; •• The emergence of a more polycentric world characterised by a shift of power away from states, and growing governance gaps as the mechanisms for inter-state relations fail to respond adequately to global public demands

Euro and the financial relations between Latin America and Europe :

medium- and long-term implications
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
71 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The internationalisation of the euro is in its initial stages and it is still difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding its scope and its implications for Latin America. Indeed, the emergence of an internationally used currency is slow and subject to inertial forces. Nonetheless, several fairly robust conclusions can be inferred from the results of the document. The most plausible medium- to long-term international scenario seems to be development of an asymmetrical duopoly between the euro and the dollar. In a context of scant international monetary cooperation, this scenario could lead to high volatility between the two main international currencies, which will be a powerful destabilising factor for third countries. In terms of official international reserves, the growing financial use of the single European currency and the development of Euroland capital markets should lead to greater diversification in favour of the euro in the medium and long term. Together with other factors, the growth of the euro bond market will tend to increase the pressure to widen and deepen the euro financial market and make it more liquid. This should favour the development of better conditions for both European and third-country participants. The geographic diversification strategy implemented by the European banks, and the boom in European foreign direct investment could also favour greater international use of the euro. For Latin America, the sustained increase in the share of euro-denominated international bond issues, chiefly by the public sector, makes it necessary to consider policies for managing the currency composition of the external debt. On the other hand, the medium- to long-term consequences of an increasingly bipolar but asymmetrical international monetary system will have to be included in the Latin America national exchange rate policies, enhancing the possibility of adopting anchor baskets.

Direction of Causality Between Financial Development and Economic Growth. Evidence for Developing Countries

Publisher: 
Vasile Goldis University Press
City: 
Arad
Volume, number, page: 
26:2, pp.1-22
Theme: 
Abstract: 
The results of extensive studies that analyzed the existence and meaning of correlations between the economic growth and the financial market development lead us to a more thorough study of these correlations. Therefore, we performed a broad study of the developing countries from around the world (the developing part of each region constructed by the World Bank through its Statistics Bureau). The regions taken into analysis were: Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, the Arab world, Latin America & and the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa. For comparison purposes, we have also included in the sample the North American countries, the Euro Area and the European Union as a whole, because these last three areas are the main benchmarks of the financial markets.
The results are consistent with those from previous studies on the subject and vary depending on region and financial indicator considered.

LAC’s insecure economies

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
4, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
With falling commodity prices, slowing Chinese growth and tightening financial conditions, the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have once again revealed their vulnerability to global headwinds – albeit to varying degrees. Dragged down by the faltering economies of Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela, the region has been experiencing economic deceleration for the past five years, with 2015 marking the first of overall regional contraction since 2009.

Beyond the Recovery

Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Trade and Integration Monitor : Beyond the Recovery: Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Publisher: 
IDB
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
566, 111 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The Trade and Integration Monitor 2017 analyzes the current trade recovery and assesses the capacity of the region to compete in global markets. It argues that, having overcome the longest trade contraction in recent history, Latin American and Caribbean countries face a trade outlook substantially less favorable than the one prevailing before the crisis. The end of the commodity price super cycle signals the urgent need for policies aimed at boosting competitiveness and at taking advantage of the opportunities provided by disruptive technologies such as e-commerce. - See more at: https://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/8642#sthash.zwColfIU.dpuf

The EU-Latin American Strategic Partnership

state of play and ways forward Study
The EU-Latin American Strategic Partnership: state of play and ways forward
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
88 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
By looking at the current social, economic and political trends in Latin America and the Caribbean and at recent developments in the EU’s relation with the region, this study explores windows of opportunity for advancing the EU-Latin American strategic partnership. It is argued that, although asymmetries between Europe and Latin America might impact and diminish the bi-regional relationship, the EU is well-positioned to play a more active role in Latin America by strengthening existing institutional links, such as the strategic bi-regional partnership between the EU and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) and the Euro-Latin America Parliamentary Assembly (EuroLat). The study concludes with tailor-made recommendations in order to advance the EU’s engagement and cooperation with individual Latin American countries and with the region as a whole, both through traditional cooperative channels and through closer parliamentary links within the framework of EuroLat.

Cluster Report

Trade Integration in Latin America and the Caribbean
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
17/66, pp.1-55.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This cluster report takes stock of and explores opportunities for trade integration in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Drawing on a set of 12 analytical studies that will be issued as working papers, the report examines the determinants of trade, explores the potential to enhance LAC’s trade integration, and assesses the associated economic and social effects. To deepen understanding of the region’s policy options and trade strategies, the report also incorporates the views of LAC country authorities based on responses to a survey. This provides an opportunity to examine the alignment of recommendations based on the analytical findings with the region’s current trade policy priorities, with the caveat that the survey was conducted between late 2015 and mid-2016, prior to the most recent developments in the global trade landscape.

The Best of Two Worlds

Conference on CSR in Europe - Latin America and the Caribbean - Proceedings of the Conference on CSR in Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean.
Publisher: 
BID
City: 
Salvador de Bahía
Volume, number, page: 
Dec 2006, pp.1-30.
Abstract: 
The Conference on CSR in Europe - Latin America and the Caribbean: “The Best of Two Worlds” gathered a large number of business leaders, practitioners, government officials, NGOs, academics, and civil society representatives from both regions. The main goal of the conference was to strengthen the exchange of CSR experiences in the countries of Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean in order to explore what companies can learn from each other in the CSR field. Through case presentations the conference highlighted bi-regional experiences and approaches to CSR. Focus was on: 1) global versus local CSR strategies; 2) how to overcome cultural differences; 3) CSR alliances among different types of organisations in Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean; and 4) perspectives for further cooperation and exchange of experiences between the two regions

The European Union and the Caribbean Region: Situating the Caribbean Overseas Countries and Territories.

Publisher: 
CEDLA
City: 
Amsterdam
Volume, number, page: 
93, pp.79-94
Abstract: 
This paper examines one important dimension of the European Union's (EU) 'regional' engagement with the Caribbean: its relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCT), with a particular focus on the possibility of furthering the policy goals of greater regional integration and cooperation. It does so in three parts. The first sets out the basis for current EU policy to the OCT which has been under discussion between the EU, the OCT and the four EU member states most involved (Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) since 2008. It reports EU proposals for change and the responses to them by the Caribbean OCTs. The second part examines EU policy toward promoting greater regional cooperation among the Caribbean OCTs and between them and some of the other Caribbean regional organizations. Three distinct frameworks for cooperation and integration are discussed: with independent states as established in the Caribbean Community, the Caribbean Forum and the Economic Partnership Agreement; with the French departments and collectivities; and with the Caribbean OCT. In each the position of the Caribbean OCT is situated. The final part briefly discusses the creation of a 'new' framework for regional cooperation specific for the Caribbean OCT which will most closely match their interests in the Caribbean.
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