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International economic cooperation agreements

EU and Latin America. A Stronger Partnership?

Publisher: 
Ledizioni LediPublishing
City: 
Milan
Volume, number, page: 
137 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
2019 will be the year of the twentieth anniversary of the EU-LAC bi-regional Strategic Partnership. But will it also be the year of the desired turning point for EU-LAC relations? Will Europe be able to re-launch political and economic dialogue with LAC countries, especially taking into account that its engagement combines different levels of relations: regional, through the EU-LAC Strategic Partnership, sub-regional, with different regional organizations such as Mercosur or the Pacific Alliance, and bilateral, with individual countries? And finally, will Europe and Latin American countries be able to navigate through today’s choppy international waters, with rising tides of populism and protectionism mounting on both shores of the Atlantic? These issues are at the core of this ISPI report. EU-LAC relations are a litmus test for Brussels to show that it still has the potential to scale up its influence in the region, notwithstanding the current divisions and lack of vision of the EU itself. Building upon a less ambitious but more pragmatic agenda, Europe may indeed re-launch a win-win partnership.

Trade :

The Undervalued Driver of Regional Integration in Latin America
Publisher: 
GIGA
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
n.5 , pp.1-10.
Abstract: 
Many regional organisations in Latin America are currently in crisis. Trade agreements, however, have made progress in the region. Today, 80 per cent of intra-regional trade is already under preferences. In March 2017 several international financial organisations – the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) – each independently proposed the creation of a Latin American and Caribbean free trade area

China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union

a triangular relationship?
China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union: a triangular relationship?
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Abstract: 
These are the Conference Proceedings of the Workshop-Seminar “China, Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union – A triangular relationship?”
Based on China’s emergence as a new economic and political power and an active member of the international community, as well as the increasingly complex political and economic relationships this country has established both towards the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean, the conveners of the Workshop-Seminar invited distinguished experts, scholars and representatives from international institutions to discuss the current political and economic dynamics between the three parties, and their implications. By identifying potential scenarios, opportunities, risks and challenges, the participants provided first-hand insights and assessed, in exchange with the audience, whether there was room for an enhanced political and economic collaboration between the three regions.

The EU-Latin American Strategic Partnership

state of play and ways forward
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
90 p.
Abstract: 
By looking at the current social, economic and political trends in Latin America and the Caribbean and at recent developments in the EU’s relation with the region, this study explores windows of opportunity for advancing the EU-Latin American strategic partnership. It is argued that, although asymmetries between Europe and Latin America might impact and diminish the bi-regional relationship, the EU is wellpositioned to play a more active role in Latin America by strengthening existing institutional links, such as the strategic bi-regional partnership between the EU and the
Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) and the Euro-Latin America Parliamentary Assembly (EuroLat). The study concludes with tailor-made recommendations in order to advance the EU’s engagement and cooperation with individual Latin American countries and with the region as a whole, both through traditional cooperative channels and through closer parliamentary links within the framework of EuroLat.

Overview and figures

in-depth analysis
Overview and figures
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
24 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Trade relations between the EU and Latin American countries have come back into the spotlight in recent years. Collectively, the countries forming the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) represent the fifth largest trading partner of the EU. The EU has concluded agreements with two Latin American (LA) groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group) and with four other Latin American countries (Mexico, Chile, Peru and Colombia). The FTAs concluded by the EU with Latin American countries differ considerably in terms of coverage and methodology depending on the time at which they were concluded and the context of the negotiations. The EU now aims to modernise the oldest FTAs, concluded with Mexico and Chile, in order to align them to the current standards of EU FTAs. The longstanding negotiations on a comprehensive trade agreement with Mercosur – which would mean the EU then had trade agreements with nearly all of Latin America – are yet to pick up pace, however

The European Union's Policy Towards Mercosur : Responsive Not Strategic

The European Union's Policy Towards Mercosur : Responsive Not Strategic
Publisher: 
University of Manchester
City: 
Manchester
Volume, number, page: 
238 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This monograph seeks to examine the motivations that determine the European Union ’ s (EU) policy towards the Common Market of the South
(Mercosur), which is the most important relationship that the EU has with another regional economic integration organization. In order to investigate these motivations (or lack thereof), this volume will examine the contribution of the main policy- and decision-makers, the European Commission and the Council of Ministers, as well as the different contributions of the two institutions. This will make it possible to show the degree of engagement’ refl ected in the EU ’ s policy towards Mercosur,which is the dependent variable in this study. The analysis offered here
examines the development of EU policy towards Mercosur in relation to three key stages: non-institutionalized relations (1986–1990), offi cial relations (1991–1995), and the negotiations for an association agreement (1996–2004 and 2010–present). The degree of engagement will be measured as low, medium or high. The outcome of the measure is created by analysing two factors: the level of ‘ambition’ and the level of ‘commitment’.
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