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International cooperation

L'ampliació de la Unió Europea

els efectes a l'Amèrica Llatina
Publisher: 
INEHCA
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
9:31, pp.67-85
Abstract: 
With the accession of ten new countries on May 1, 2004, the European Union completed its largest ever extension. With the current 25 members, the EU is consolidated as one of the biggest markets in the world and, as is logical, this new reality entails political and economic upheavals. The author shows how this process has aroused an incipient fear among EU partners in Latin America due to this greater interest shown in the Eastern European countries. Countries whose economy is based on agriculture and livestock, such as Argentina, fear that the new agrarian markets (particularly Poland) may affect their trade dealings with the EU. Nevertheless, for the moment, events have allayed these fears. Be that as it may, the author feels that it is imperative that the traditional relations between European and Latin America continue to be strengthened, based on a certain scale of shared values, as the only way to make progress in the strategic cooperation of the two partners, and thus bring greater stability and democracy to an increasingly more globalised world.

Evaluation of DG ECHO's Actions on Building Resilience in the LAC Region 02-10/2016

Final report : 02-10/2016
Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
142 p.
Abstract: 
This evaluation covers DG ECHO-funded initiatives aiming to increase the resilience of communities and countries to future stresses and shocks in Latin America and the Caribbean between 2012 and 2016. Exacerbated by growing urbanization, the region is exposed to natural hazards, political crises and climate change. ECHO contributions consist of the systematic inclusion of resilience into most of its humanitarian programs as well as the funding of dedicated risk reduction initiatives. ECHO funded a total 258 projects for an amount of 220 million Euros, 60% of this in Haiti and Colombia. Sustained risk reduction initiatives contributed to the growing commitment of regional and most national authorities to increase resilience. The effectiveness of resilience initiatives at community level depended to a large part on local and national ownership. When lacking, as often the case in Haiti, results were questionable. The recommendations include: to improve synergy and on-site cooperation between EU and EC development actors and ECHO, to focus efforts on fewer, larger, multi-partner initiatives, to support efforts at multiple scales within a country to assure a systems approach, and to develop a mechanism to objectively measure the impact on beneficiaries of past initiatives once a major stress or disaster occurs

The EU-Latin American Strategic Partnership

state of play and ways forward
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
90 p.
Abstract: 
By looking at the current social, economic and political trends in Latin America and the Caribbean and at recent developments in the EU’s relation with the region, this study explores windows of opportunity for advancing the EU-Latin American strategic partnership. It is argued that, although asymmetries between Europe and Latin America might impact and diminish the bi-regional relationship, the EU is wellpositioned to play a more active role in Latin America by strengthening existing institutional links, such as the strategic bi-regional partnership between the EU and the
Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) and the Euro-Latin America Parliamentary Assembly (EuroLat). The study concludes with tailor-made recommendations in order to advance the EU’s engagement and cooperation with individual Latin American countries and with the region as a whole, both through traditional cooperative channels and through closer parliamentary links within the framework of EuroLat.

LAIF, Latin America investment facility, CIF Caribbean Investment Facility

2015 operational report
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
47 p.
Abstract: 
The Latin America Investment Facility (LAIF) and the Caribbean Investment Facility (CIF) are two of the EU’s regional blending facilities, innovative financial instruments that use EU development grants to leverage additional investment from European and Regional Development Finance Institutions to implement key infrastructure and private sector support projects in partner countries.
This report, which covers the Facilities’ operational activities in 2015, provides a detailed overview of projects funded in a wide range of sectors,
from transport and energy, to water, sanitation and the environment. The report also describes how LAIF and CIF support the EU’s development priorities in their respective regions by engaging with the private sector to ensure that development assistance has the widest possible impact and
contributes to poverty eradication and to economic growth and job creation.
The Facilities also support policy objectives related to climate goals, with projects that contribute to partner countries’ capacity to adapt to and
mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Overview and figures

in-depth analysis
Overview and figures
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
24 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Trade relations between the EU and Latin American countries have come back into the spotlight in recent years. Collectively, the countries forming the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) represent the fifth largest trading partner of the EU. The EU has concluded agreements with two Latin American (LA) groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group) and with four other Latin American countries (Mexico, Chile, Peru and Colombia). The FTAs concluded by the EU with Latin American countries differ considerably in terms of coverage and methodology depending on the time at which they were concluded and the context of the negotiations. The EU now aims to modernise the oldest FTAs, concluded with Mexico and Chile, in order to align them to the current standards of EU FTAs. The longstanding negotiations on a comprehensive trade agreement with Mercosur – which would mean the EU then had trade agreements with nearly all of Latin America – are yet to pick up pace, however

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
36 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Sexual violence against minors is a major problem in Latin America. Children are mostly at risk in their own homes, while adolescents are at risk in their homes but also in the wider community (for instance, schools or boyfriends). However, data is very limited due to silence around the issue. Latin America is highly patriarchal, is riven by inequalities within and between social groups, and has weak judicial institutions; these are all factors that impact on gender based violence. However, governments in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, and Paraguay are starting to see children as individuals with rights, rather than minors under the sole authority of fathers, and are designing laws and agencies to protect those rights. Civil society in the meantime is increasingly mobilising against violence against women, including violence against girls, two forms of violence that go hand in hand, at a time when the problem is increasingly recognised and acted upon globally. This report outlines possibilities for the EU to support these recent developments and initiatives to end violence against minors via the establishment of national action plans, in collaboration with national, regional and global partners.

The European Union's Policy Towards Mercosur : Responsive Not Strategic

The European Union's Policy Towards Mercosur : Responsive Not Strategic
Publisher: 
University of Manchester
City: 
Manchester
Volume, number, page: 
238 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This monograph seeks to examine the motivations that determine the European Union ’ s (EU) policy towards the Common Market of the South
(Mercosur), which is the most important relationship that the EU has with another regional economic integration organization. In order to investigate these motivations (or lack thereof), this volume will examine the contribution of the main policy- and decision-makers, the European Commission and the Council of Ministers, as well as the different contributions of the two institutions. This will make it possible to show the degree of engagement’ refl ected in the EU ’ s policy towards Mercosur,which is the dependent variable in this study. The analysis offered here
examines the development of EU policy towards Mercosur in relation to three key stages: non-institutionalized relations (1986–1990), offi cial relations (1991–1995), and the negotiations for an association agreement (1996–2004 and 2010–present). The degree of engagement will be measured as low, medium or high. The outcome of the measure is created by analysing two factors: the level of ‘ambition’ and the level of ‘commitment’.
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