Choose your language:

Foreign economic policy

There Is No Reciprocity Latin America and Europe :

Unequal Entanglements
Publisher: 
International Research Network on Interdependent Inequalities in Latin America
City: 
Berlin
Volume, number, page: 
n.91, pp.1-22
Category: 
Abstract: 
This paper presents the transformations of Latin American-European relations over time as an interdependent unequal relationship. These relations have been shaped by exports of commodities, including the enrichment of European foodways with indigenous Latin American crops and the environmentally destructive extraction of natural resources and commercial export agriculture. The transformation under colonialism led not only to the settlement of Europeans in Latin America but also to the Atlantic slave trade. The consequence of these relations of domination even today is a limited acknowledgement of Latin America as being more than an extension of Europe. With the end of European immigration to and from Latin America, the role of the United States has grown instead, and increasingly developments in Latin America have also taken on their own dynamics, decoupled from Europe. In the coming decades, relations with China which have grown rapidly in commerce and commodity exports are likely to transform the role of Europe in the region yet again.

Mexico :

Economic indicators and trade with EU
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Mexico's economy is the 15th largest in the world (in terms of GDP) and the second largest in Latin America, after Brazil. It is currently classified as an upper middle-income economy by the World Bank, and is a member of the WTO, the OECD and the G20. The EU is Mexico's third-largest trading partner after the US and China, and its second biggest export market after the US. Our infographic, produced in close cooperation with GlobalStat, provides a quick and useful overview of Mexico's main economic ...

Euro and the financial relations between Latin America and Europe :

medium- and long-term implications
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
71 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The internationalisation of the euro is in its initial stages and it is still difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding its scope and its implications for Latin America. Indeed, the emergence of an internationally used currency is slow and subject to inertial forces. Nonetheless, several fairly robust conclusions can be inferred from the results of the document. The most plausible medium- to long-term international scenario seems to be development of an asymmetrical duopoly between the euro and the dollar. In a context of scant international monetary cooperation, this scenario could lead to high volatility between the two main international currencies, which will be a powerful destabilising factor for third countries. In terms of official international reserves, the growing financial use of the single European currency and the development of Euroland capital markets should lead to greater diversification in favour of the euro in the medium and long term. Together with other factors, the growth of the euro bond market will tend to increase the pressure to widen and deepen the euro financial market and make it more liquid. This should favour the development of better conditions for both European and third-country participants. The geographic diversification strategy implemented by the European banks, and the boom in European foreign direct investment could also favour greater international use of the euro. For Latin America, the sustained increase in the share of euro-denominated international bond issues, chiefly by the public sector, makes it necessary to consider policies for managing the currency composition of the external debt. On the other hand, the medium- to long-term consequences of an increasingly bipolar but asymmetrical international monetary system will have to be included in the Latin America national exchange rate policies, enhancing the possibility of adopting anchor baskets.

Beyond the global crisis :

structural adjustments and regional integration in Europe and Latin America
Publisher: 
Routledge
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
298 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The book aims at offering a comparative, multi-perspective analysis of the different, at times parallel, at times with varying degrees of interdependence, macroeconomic and structural adjustments in the two continents against the backdrop of important processes of regional integration. Its reading offers a multifaceted appreciation of the reality emerging from the mixing up of longer run tendencies deepened by the brute force of the financial and then industrial crisis.

Relations between El Salvador and European Union Identification of TOP 10 imported/exported products

The analysis of a possible market extension
Publisher: 
University of Economics
City: 
Prague
Volume, number, page: 
17 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This paper deals with relation between El Salvador and European Union. It contains a review of existing cooperation agreements between the regions. It's main goal was to identify the TOP 10 imported and exported products. It contains an analysis of a possible expansion of the market between them and an identification of products where there is commercial potential.

The Impact of Labour Rights Commitments in EU Trade Agreements

The Case of Peru
Publisher: 
Cogitatio Press
City: 
Lisbon
Volume, number, page: 
5:4, pp.6-18.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
While the inclusion of labour rights in European Union (EU) trade agreements has become an ‘unobjectionable norm’, analyses of their impact have been largely absent from the literature. This article aims to partly fill this gap in existing research by examining the impact of labour rights commitments in the EU–Peru–Colombia agreement, with particular reference to the agricultural sector in Peru. Following a brief background overview of labour rights in agriculture in Peru, we draw up the analytical framework for assessing the impact of these commitments. We discern three distinctive legal commitments and find that they are flexible and conservative, also compared to provisions in other EU trade agreements. Subsequently, we assess the impact of these commitments by analysing to what extent they are being upheld in practice. Empirical evidence from several sources, including field research, shows that the Peruvian government has failed to implement the labour rights commitments in several respects. In the conclusions, we point to the cautious role of the EU, which has scope to monitor Peru’s labour rights compliance more proactively.

China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union

a triangular relationship?
China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union: a triangular relationship?
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Abstract: 
These are the Conference Proceedings of the Workshop-Seminar “China, Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union – A triangular relationship?”
Based on China’s emergence as a new economic and political power and an active member of the international community, as well as the increasingly complex political and economic relationships this country has established both towards the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean, the conveners of the Workshop-Seminar invited distinguished experts, scholars and representatives from international institutions to discuss the current political and economic dynamics between the three parties, and their implications. By identifying potential scenarios, opportunities, risks and challenges, the participants provided first-hand insights and assessed, in exchange with the audience, whether there was room for an enhanced political and economic collaboration between the three regions.

The European Union as a Conveniently-conflicted Counter-hegemon through Trade

Publisher: 
UACES
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
9:4, pp.560-577
Abstract: 
This article addresses the failure by scholars of EU trade policy to fully explain the difficulties faced in realising the ‘normative’ goals contained within the European Union’s external trade policy and the conviction that it might be a ‘force for good’ through trade. In seeking to account for and, in particular, move beyond the failure to fully explain these difficulties, the article adopts a critical social science approach that focuses on relations of domination and the (potentially misleading) appearances that such relations tend to uphold. In contrast to the traditional view of the EU as a potential ‘force for good’, we conceptualise it as a site of domination, focusing in particular on three mechanisms through which this domination is achieved – expansive market (capitalist) exchange, the ‘Othering’ that tends to accompany such processes of expansion, and the de-politicisation necessary to achieve and/or legitimate these processes. The article proceeds to explore recent developments in EU trade policy, and in particular the Global Europe agenda and associated new generation of free trade agreements with trade partners in Asia and Latin America. In doing so, the article examines the extent to which processes of market expansion, Othering and de-politicisation have been realised in recent EU trade policy. It argues for a conceptualisation of the European Union as a conveniently-conflicted counter-hegemon through trade, whereby the EU presents itself as a potential “force for good” through trade, but simultaneously avoids the realisation of that potential (and justifies its non-realisation) by evoking the conveniently-conflicted status that arises from institutional constraints and both internal disagreements and external differences. This account, we claim, is both more plausible than the existing empirical accounts in that it is able to explain the consistent promotion of an apparently unrealisable ‘progressive’ agenda by the European Union, and an improvement upon those accounts in that it illuminates and demystifies relations of domination and certain ideas that act to uphold them.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Foreign economic policy