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Financial foreign aid

Implementation of Colombia's peace agreement

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
In the year since the signature of the new final peace agreement on 24 November 2016, the peace process in Colombia has not progressed smoothly. Although the disarmament of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and its transformation into a political party, as well as the reduction in violence associated with the conflict, have been a success, aspects such as reintegrating FARC members into civilian life, legal implementation, and rural reform are lagging behind. This is likely to influence the country's presidential and legislative elections due to be held in 2018.

Feasibility study of the European Union - Latin america Bi-regional solidarity fund proposed by the European Parliament

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
21 p.
Abstract: 
This document presents a detailed examination of the feasibility of the European Parliament proposal contained in its resolution of 15 November 2001 to create a European Union - Latin America Bi-regional Solidarity Fund. That proposal has been repeated since then on numerous occasions and in various forums but has not yet been seriously considered either by the European Commission or by the Council. In this context, and on the eve of the Vienna Summit, this document sets out various specific proposals on the basic guidelines for the creation of the Fund, both as regards its organisational structure and in relation to its financial aspects and scope.

Climate Finance Regional Briefing:

Latin America
Publisher: 
ODI
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
n.6.
Abstract: 
Latin America is a highly heterogeneous region, with differences in levels of economic development and social and indigenous history, both among and within countries. The impacts of climate change, in particular glacial melt and changes in river flows, extreme events and risks to food production systems affect development in both rural and urban areas in the region (World Bank, 2014). Climate finance in the Latin American region is highly concentrated, with a few of the largest countries in the region such as Brazil and Mexico receiving a large share of the funding. Mitigation activities receive more than eight times that of adaptation at USD 2.4 billion and USD 0.3 billion respectively. Since 2003, a total of USD 2.8 billion has been approved for 359 projects in the region.1 Of this amount, USD 1.8 billion is in the form of grants, while slightly over USD 1 billion is provided through concessional loans, largely through projects funded under the World Bank’s Climate
Investment Funds, implemented in the region by the Inter-American Development Bank. Only nine projects have been approved in Latin America by multilateral climate funds so far in 2016. Notably, these include three projects under the new Green Climate Fund, which is providing USD 112 million in loans and grants to support solar energy in Chile, energy efficiency investments in El Salvador and forest protection measures in Ecuador.

Scientific and technological cooperation on socio-economic and environmental challenges between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
17 p.
Abstract: 
EU-LAC Summits since Madrid in 2002 have promoted the development of a shared Knowledge Area. European Research Framework Programmes are among the principal instruments for its development. In the 6th Research Framework Programme (FP6: 2002-2006) alone,some 221 collaborative scientific projects mobilised 538 teams from Latin America (529) and the Caribbean (9) and 2,679 European (and other non-Latin American) teams with a total value of more than €1.3 billion (EC contribution more than €700 million). Many of these address directly the topics forming the basis of dialogue at the level of the 2008 Lima Summit between Heads of State and Government from the EU-LAC regions.
Under the 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7: 2007-2013) international cooperation is intended to be more substantial, better coordinated and integrated by opening all its components to international cooperation and a high percentage of research opportunities are directly relevant for improved transitions towards sustainable development and a better grasp of the socio-economic conditions for change. It also creates an enabling framework for such cooperation through measures on scientific and technological policy dialogue, promotion and activities to improve coordination of international S&T cooperation of EU Member States.
The present leaflet shows a small sample of concrete collaborations contributing to making the EU-LAC Knowledge Area a reality.

European Union regional cooperation with Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Abstract: 
The EU has over 20 years of experience of regional cooperation with Latin America. Regional programmes have been the main tool to strengthen links between countries within the region, promote sub-regional integration, and foster bi-regional cooperation. 18 countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela) can take part in the regional programmes, under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI). Europe has strong historic and cultural ties with the Caribbean region, and a long tradition of close cooperation. The EU’s relations with Caribbean countries are based on political relations, trade and development funding at both national and regional levels. The Africa, Caribbean and Pacifi c (ACP) - EU Cotonou Agreement signed in 2000 by 15 Caribbean nations, is the framework for cooperation. It is complemented by the 2008 Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with CARIFORUM (the Forum of the Caribbean Group of ACP) and the 2012 Joint Caribbean EU Partnership Strategy. The Caribbean region represents the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago. The region also includes 17 territories with direct links to EU Member States (four French ‘outermost regions’; and thirteen ‘overseas territories’– six British, six Dutch and one French territory).
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