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Financial Co-operation

EU-Latin America relations :

Charting a course for the future, Report of the European Policy Summit
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
41 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Latin America and the European Union have great potential for future cooperation on a range of global challenges, participants told a conference co-organised by Friends of Europe and the Konrad Adenaur Stiftung. “Latin American countries are now largely dynamic democracies,” said Christian Leffler, Managing Director for the Americas at the European External Action Service. “This has allowed a strengthening of ties. The stock of EU investment in Brazil is bigger than EU investment in Russia and China together, and there is a long-standing relationship to build on.”

Scientific and technological cooperation on socio-economic and environmental challenges between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
17 p.
Abstract: 
EU-LAC Summits since Madrid in 2002 have promoted the development of a shared Knowledge Area. European Research Framework Programmes are among the principal instruments for its development. In the 6th Research Framework Programme (FP6: 2002-2006) alone,some 221 collaborative scientific projects mobilised 538 teams from Latin America (529) and the Caribbean (9) and 2,679 European (and other non-Latin American) teams with a total value of more than €1.3 billion (EC contribution more than €700 million). Many of these address directly the topics forming the basis of dialogue at the level of the 2008 Lima Summit between Heads of State and Government from the EU-LAC regions.
Under the 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7: 2007-2013) international cooperation is intended to be more substantial, better coordinated and integrated by opening all its components to international cooperation and a high percentage of research opportunities are directly relevant for improved transitions towards sustainable development and a better grasp of the socio-economic conditions for change. It also creates an enabling framework for such cooperation through measures on scientific and technological policy dialogue, promotion and activities to improve coordination of international S&T cooperation of EU Member States.
The present leaflet shows a small sample of concrete collaborations contributing to making the EU-LAC Knowledge Area a reality.

Direction of Causality Between Financial Development and Economic Growth. Evidence for Developing Countries

Publisher: 
Vasile Goldis University Press
City: 
Arad
Volume, number, page: 
26:2, pp.1-22
Theme: 
Abstract: 
The results of extensive studies that analyzed the existence and meaning of correlations between the economic growth and the financial market development lead us to a more thorough study of these correlations. Therefore, we performed a broad study of the developing countries from around the world (the developing part of each region constructed by the World Bank through its Statistics Bureau). The regions taken into analysis were: Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, the Arab world, Latin America & and the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa. For comparison purposes, we have also included in the sample the North American countries, the Euro Area and the European Union as a whole, because these last three areas are the main benchmarks of the financial markets.
The results are consistent with those from previous studies on the subject and vary depending on region and financial indicator considered.

The economic impact of violence in LAC

implications for the EU
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
16, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the costs arising from violence outweigh the expenditure devoted to preventing or containing it. To help address this, the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) has developed a model that measures both overt and hidden expenditures. In this report for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), José Luengo-Cabrera suggests that the IEP model can serve as a benchmark for assessments of the cost-effectiveness of public security programmes, and inform decisions on optimising the levels of spending needed to contain violence. He also discusses the lessons of the model and its results for the EU.
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