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Making mobility work for adaptation to environmental changes :

Results from the MECLEP global research
Publisher: 
IOM
City: 
Geneva
Volume, number, page: 
144 p.
Abstract: 
This report is the final publication of the European Union–funded Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Evidence for Policy (MECLEP) project. The comparative report builds on desk reviews, household surveys and qualitative interviews conducted in the six project countries (Dominican Republic, Haiti, Kenya, Republic of Mauritius, Papua New Guinea and Viet Nam) to assess the extent to which migration, including displacement and planned relocation, can benefit or undermine adaptation to environmental and climate change. Despite the different social and environmental contexts of the six studied countries, migration serves as an adaptation strategy as it often helps migrant households to diversify income and increase their preparedness for future hazards. Conversely, displacement due to natural hazards tends to pose challenges to adaptation as it increases the vulnerability of those displaced. Finally, planned relocation can both represent a successful adaptation strategy and expose the affected population to new vulnerabilities.

In this regard, the report highlights the importance of sharing examples of good practices for locally driven and rights-based planned relocations. Other important policy implications include the need for the following:

(a) Investing in disaster risk reduction and resilience to address environmental displacement;
(b) Integrating migration into urban planning to reduce challenges for migrants and communities of destination; and
(c) Stressing the importance of paying particular attention to gender issues and the needs of vulnerable groups, such as the elderly and trapped population.

In general, the report demonstrates how data and evidence are fundamental in formulating comprehensive policy responses and facilitating the potential positive effects of environmental migration.

Climate Finance Regional Briefing:

Latin America
Publisher: 
ODI
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
n.6.
Abstract: 
Latin America is a highly heterogeneous region, with differences in levels of economic development and social and indigenous history, both among and within countries. The impacts of climate change, in particular glacial melt and changes in river flows, extreme events and risks to food production systems affect development in both rural and urban areas in the region (World Bank, 2014). Climate finance in the Latin American region is highly concentrated, with a few of the largest countries in the region such as Brazil and Mexico receiving a large share of the funding. Mitigation activities receive more than eight times that of adaptation at USD 2.4 billion and USD 0.3 billion respectively. Since 2003, a total of USD 2.8 billion has been approved for 359 projects in the region.1 Of this amount, USD 1.8 billion is in the form of grants, while slightly over USD 1 billion is provided through concessional loans, largely through projects funded under the World Bank’s Climate
Investment Funds, implemented in the region by the Inter-American Development Bank. Only nine projects have been approved in Latin America by multilateral climate funds so far in 2016. Notably, these include three projects under the new Green Climate Fund, which is providing USD 112 million in loans and grants to support solar energy in Chile, energy efficiency investments in El Salvador and forest protection measures in Ecuador.

The EIB outside the EU

Delivering on EU policies Reporting on results
Publisher: 
EIB
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
[80 p.]
Abstract: 
This annual report presents the results of EIB activities, delivering on EU policies outside Europe. The 2016 report on “The EIB outside the EU” presents the EIB's activity in the past year, delivering EU policies beyond Europe's borders: in Pre-accession countries, African Caribbean and Pacific countries, Eastern neighbours, Mediterranean partner countries, Asia and Latin America. It describes how the Bank is working to deliver results on issues such as the SDGs, climate and migration, and the financial and technical contribution we are able to provide. This year's report is the fifth since the introduction of the Results Measurement (ReM) framework which is used for keeping track and reporting of EIB projects results outside the EU.

Evaluation of DG ECHO's Actions on Building Resilience in the LAC Region 02-10/2016

Final report : 02-10/2016
Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
142 p.
Abstract: 
This evaluation covers DG ECHO-funded initiatives aiming to increase the resilience of communities and countries to future stresses and shocks in Latin America and the Caribbean between 2012 and 2016. Exacerbated by growing urbanization, the region is exposed to natural hazards, political crises and climate change. ECHO contributions consist of the systematic inclusion of resilience into most of its humanitarian programs as well as the funding of dedicated risk reduction initiatives. ECHO funded a total 258 projects for an amount of 220 million Euros, 60% of this in Haiti and Colombia. Sustained risk reduction initiatives contributed to the growing commitment of regional and most national authorities to increase resilience. The effectiveness of resilience initiatives at community level depended to a large part on local and national ownership. When lacking, as often the case in Haiti, results were questionable. The recommendations include: to improve synergy and on-site cooperation between EU and EC development actors and ECHO, to focus efforts on fewer, larger, multi-partner initiatives, to support efforts at multiple scales within a country to assure a systems approach, and to develop a mechanism to objectively measure the impact on beneficiaries of past initiatives once a major stress or disaster occurs
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