Choose your language:

European Political Cooperation

Honduras as a Complex Adaptive System and What It Means for the European Union

The Case of Violence
Publisher: 
GIGA
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
n.294
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This paper assesses why the various initiatives undertaken by the European Union in Honduras have not had the desired impact of reducing the extraordinary levels of violence in the country. The hypothesis put forward is that the EU’s approach to the issue of violence has been unsuccessful because it does not match the complexity of the problem encountered.
As an alternative, the paper puts forward complexity and human systems dynamics as conceptual frameworks for reinterpreting the issue of violence. It shows that violence is one of the results of an incoherent process of self‐organisation which marks Honduras and suggests ways of influencing the conditions that make up this pattern in order to address the problem of violence. It also outlines what this new approach would mean for the actions and policies proposed and implemented by the European Union.

ACP-EU relations beyond 2020

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2p.
Abstract: 
Twenty-eight European Union (EU) Member States and 78 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries are legally bound by the provisions of the Cotonou Agreement, with its three intertwined pillars: a political dimension, development strategies and economic and trade cooperation. In
February 2020, the Cotonou Agreement will expire and a new relationship has to be designed, taking into account the achievements and shortcomings of the agreement. The EU position is expected by May 2017. The European Parliament's consent will be required before a new agreement is concluded

International Agreements in Progress :

EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
8 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Cuba is the only Latin American country to have no bilateral agreement with the EU. Between 1996 and December 2016, relations between the EU and Cuba were governed by the 1996 Common Position, which subordinated cooperation and the conclusion of any bilateral agreement to the achievement of visible progress in the field of democracy and human rights on the island. Nevertheless, political dialogue and cooperation were re-launched in 2008, following a leadership change in the country, and in February 2014 negotiating directives for a bilateral EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement were adopted by the Council. After seven rounds of negotiation, the agreement together with the proposal for its conclusion was published by the Commission on 25 November 2016, and the agreement was signed on 12 December 2016. Its three main chapters concern political dialogue, cooperation and sectoral policy dialogue, and trade and trade cooperation. Human rights remain a contentious issue.
The agreement has been submitted to the European Parliament for consent to its conclusion. The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted a recommendation to give consent and an accompanying report on 20 June 2017; these are due to be voted during the July 2017 plenary session. The agreement also needs to be ratified by the EU's Member States.

The European Union and Latin America

‘Transformative power Europe’ versus the realities of economic interests
City: 
Cambridge
Volume, number, page: 
28:4, pp.621-640
Abstract: 
Relations between the European Union (EU) and regional subgroups in Latin America (Mercosur, the Andean Community and Central America) are clear examples of ‘pure interregionalism’ and provide evidence of the EU's active promotion of regional integration. Within the context of these cases, this article explores what type of international power the EU wields, how interregionalism is embedded in that power, and how it is deployed. Combining strands of literature on EU–Latin American relations, interregionalism, EU external policy and power provides a framework within which interregionalism can be understood as an important normative and practical tool for the EU's external power projection. Drawing on official documentation and interviews with key individuals, the paper highlights the EU's articulation of power in interregional relations and reflects upon its mixed success. It concludes that, while imperial qualities and aspirations can be observed in the EU's penchant for interregionalism, the transformative power of the EU remains limited.

The European Parliament and its International Relations

The European Parliament and its international relations
Publisher: 
Routledge
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
304 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This book analyses the role of the European Parliament as an international actor and presents a new debate about its role outside the EU territory. It explores different policy areas including human rights, international aid, trade, crisis management and the environment to provide a systematic analysis of the modern global role of the European Parliament. The book also considers the European Parliament’s regional interactions with Africa, Latin America, the United States, Asia and the Middle East. With a common analytical framework and research covering the lifespan of the European Parliament from its first direct elections in 1979 to the present day, this comprehensive volume presents an unparalleled analysis of one of the most important institutions in the European Union.

EU foreign policy towards Latin America 

EU foreign policy towards Latin America 
Publisher: 
Palgrave Macmillan
City: 
Basingstoke
Volume, number, page: 
187 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This book analyzes the relations between two geographical areas with different levels of regional institutionalization: the European Union and Latin America. Characterized by low interdependence and asymmetry, this relationship operates in different levels ranging from EU-individual countries to EU-Latin American summits.

L'ampliació de la Unió Europea

els efectes a l'Amèrica Llatina
Publisher: 
INEHCA
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
9:31, pp.67-85
Abstract: 
With the accession of ten new countries on May 1, 2004, the European Union completed its largest ever extension. With the current 25 members, the EU is consolidated as one of the biggest markets in the world and, as is logical, this new reality entails political and economic upheavals. The author shows how this process has aroused an incipient fear among EU partners in Latin America due to this greater interest shown in the Eastern European countries. Countries whose economy is based on agriculture and livestock, such as Argentina, fear that the new agrarian markets (particularly Poland) may affect their trade dealings with the EU. Nevertheless, for the moment, events have allayed these fears. Be that as it may, the author feels that it is imperative that the traditional relations between European and Latin America continue to be strengthened, based on a certain scale of shared values, as the only way to make progress in the strategic cooperation of the two partners, and thus bring greater stability and democracy to an increasingly more globalised world.
Subscribe to RSS - European Political Cooperation