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Education

Migration and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Publisher: 
ODI
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
133 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Migration is one of the defining features of the 21st century. It contributes significantly to all aspects of economic and social development everywhere, and as such will be key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
But migration can also negatively impact development, and though the relationship between the two is increasingly recognised, it remains under-explored. We must ensure migration contributes to positive development outcomes and, ultimately, to realising the Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (the ‘2030 Agenda’). To do this, we need to understand the impact of migration on the achievement of all SDGs, and – equally – the impact this achievement will have on future migration patterns.
Here we collate, and draw out key findings from, a series of twelve ODI policy briefings which analyse the interrelationship between migration and key development areas. Each briefing explores how the links between migration and these different development issues affect the achievement of the SDGs, and offers pragmatic recommendations to incorporate migration into the 2030 Agenda to ensure it contributes to positive development outcomes.

Latin American universities and the Bologna Process

from commercialisation to the Tuning competencies project
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
8:3, pp.443-455
Abstract: 
Through the Tuning-Latin America competencies project, Latin American universities have been incorporated into the Bologna Process. In 2003 the European Commission approved an initiative of this project for Latin America and began to promote it among ministries, university presidents' organisations and other institutions in Latin America. This initiative, however, carries problematic implications. It is an initiative which: (1) simply copies a European model and applies it unchanged to Latin America; (2) opens the door to greater influence by large corporations in the universities; (3) maintains the idea of the pensamiento unico, or single way of thinking, seen now in a single group of competencies that are considered valid for Europe and Latin America, without considering the enormous cultural, social and political diversity of the countries of those regions; (4) offers an educational-pedagogical approach that fragments the professional education of students; and finally (5) has a negative impact on the work and identity of Latin American university professors and students as key players in university transformation. Adapted from the source document.

FAP APC-UE’s model of cooperation between the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean in the field of Higher Education, Science, Technology and Innovation

Publisher: 
CES - Centre of European Studies
City: 
Bucharest
Volume, number, page: 
11:1, pp.51-62
Abstract: 
If we think about the starting point of the cooperation between Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union, we may have various alternatives in mind, but the frameworks that have been set up in 1999 by the First LAC-EU Summit of Heads of State and Government and in 2013 by the First CELAC-EU Summit of Heads of State and Government, we encounter a biregional partnerships between peers, based on common grounds established by the two parts. As a continuation, the cooperation extended to education, which is one of the domains outlined as important from the very beginning and which produces effects upon other features. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse the formation of the Permanent Academic Forum (FAP ALC-UE), its methodology for the process of bioregional partnership and the process of Academic Summits organised by
its members.

EU-CELAC academic cooperation through Erasmus

Opportunities for Latin America and the Caribbean
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
4p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Erasmus+ is the EU programme for education, training, youth and sport for the period 2014-2020. Erasmus+ funds academic and youth mobility and cooperation between Europe and other regions in the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean. Erasmus+ supports activities that are closely matched with the EU's priorities for cooperation policy with these regions. CELAC countries can take part in Erasmus+ as partner countries in four types of projects in the higher education sector, and in youth cooperation projects. Three years into the programme, we can see how popular these initiatives are with CELAC countries

LASA Forum

50 Years
Publisher: 
LASA
City: 
Pittsburgh
Volume, number, page: 
XLVIII : 4, pp.1-20.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The association's quarterly newsletter. In addition to timely, research-based articles, the newsletter provides information about LASA activities, including how to propose panels and papers for the LASA congress, and serves as an important source of information on employment, grant opportunities and conferences of interest. It is the official vehicle for conveying news about the Latin American Studies Association to its members.

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