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Economy

Silver economy

opportunities and challenges to Brazil adopt the European Union's strategy
Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis Ltd.
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
29: 2, pp.115-133
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This paper deals with the construction of the silver economy (or the longevity economy) strategy in Brazil and its contribution to the economic development. The first and second parts of the paper summarize the international debate on the concept, mainly in the countries of the European Union. The third part approaches the focus on the ageing population in Brazil, still dominated by a pessimistic view. In the next section of the paper, the action opportunities for the longevity saving strategy in Brazil are exposed with summaries of some key sectors, according to the international literature on the silver economy. The income of the older people and the purchasing power of families with older adults are analysed in the following sections. In the conclusion, some recommended actions for building the silver economy strategy in Brazil is discussed.

Coping with Financial Crises: Latin American Answers to European Questions

Publisher: 
l’Institut de hautes études internationales et du ‎développement - Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
City: 
Geneva
Volume, number, page: 
4.2, pp,7-28
Abstract: 
Europe faces challenges reminiscent of Latin American financial crises, namely unsustainable sovereign spreads, banking system distress, sudden stops in capital flows and growth rate collapse. The failure of recent liquidity support to normalize the situation suggests the need to refocus the policy debate on fundamentals: structural reform for growth and, where needed, restructuring to resolve banking crises and the debt overhang. Latin America’s experience yields relevant policy lessons for Europe on all these fronts, tempered only by the slight exception that sharp real devaluation, which was key to spearheading recovery in Latin America, is unfeasible in the eurozone. Struggling eurozone countries are caught between a rock and a hard place, as the currency union imposes strict policy constraints while the reintroduction of national currencies under conditions of crisis would be catastrophic. Nevertheless, contemporary Europe stands a better chance of recovery because, in contrast with the Latin America experience, the European Union possesses greater avenues for international cooperation. With respect to financial support, a resourceful European Central Bank able to avoid chaotic adjustment by brute force is a decisive advantage of Europe relative to Latin America, which only had access to the weaker and less reliable IMF. Arguably, the limited nature of external support strongly contributed to the depth of Latin America’s great collapses. European cooperation can explore and exhaust alternatives to a euro exit to the benefit of all union members and, if dissolution becomes unavoidable, ensure amicable support to ease the transition. The path to success remains uncharted, however, and implementation of the necessary regional mechanisms will require innovation and political will. If the available means of cooperation are not used effectively, crisis countries in Europe may fare worse than those in Latin America.

Direction of Causality Between Financial Development and Economic Growth. Evidence for Developing Countries

Publisher: 
Vasile Goldis University Press
City: 
Arad
Volume, number, page: 
26:2, pp.1-22
Theme: 
Abstract: 
The results of extensive studies that analyzed the existence and meaning of correlations between the economic growth and the financial market development lead us to a more thorough study of these correlations. Therefore, we performed a broad study of the developing countries from around the world (the developing part of each region constructed by the World Bank through its Statistics Bureau). The regions taken into analysis were: Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, the Arab world, Latin America & and the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa. For comparison purposes, we have also included in the sample the North American countries, the Euro Area and the European Union as a whole, because these last three areas are the main benchmarks of the financial markets.
The results are consistent with those from previous studies on the subject and vary depending on region and financial indicator considered.

The EIB outside the EU

Delivering on EU policies Reporting on results
Publisher: 
EIB
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
[80 p.]
Abstract: 
This annual report presents the results of EIB activities, delivering on EU policies outside Europe. The 2016 report on “The EIB outside the EU” presents the EIB's activity in the past year, delivering EU policies beyond Europe's borders: in Pre-accession countries, African Caribbean and Pacific countries, Eastern neighbours, Mediterranean partner countries, Asia and Latin America. It describes how the Bank is working to deliver results on issues such as the SDGs, climate and migration, and the financial and technical contribution we are able to provide. This year's report is the fifth since the introduction of the Results Measurement (ReM) framework which is used for keeping track and reporting of EIB projects results outside the EU.

LAC’s insecure economies

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
4, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
With falling commodity prices, slowing Chinese growth and tightening financial conditions, the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have once again revealed their vulnerability to global headwinds – albeit to varying degrees. Dragged down by the faltering economies of Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela, the region has been experiencing economic deceleration for the past five years, with 2015 marking the first of overall regional contraction since 2009.

EU trade relations with Latin America

Results and challenges in implementing the EU-Colombia/Peru trade agreement
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
58 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Trade Agreement between the EU and Peru and Colombia has been provisionally implemented since the middle of 2013. However, based on limited secondary data available to date on its effects, this report shows that trade profiles have not been substantially altered. EU exports to Latin America are dominated by pharmaceuticals, machinery and vehicles, and have experienced very slight increases. Colombian exports to the EU have benefitted more than Peruvian exports from improved access, but oil and minerals remain the top exports. Fruit, vegetables, flowers and above all sugar cane and confectionaries have been the greatest beneficiaries of the tariff eliminations and reductions. Despite this lack of substantial change, the institutional arrangements and sub-committees created by the Agreement have been implemented. Civil society has also been involved in meetings of the Trade and Sustainability sub-committee, but resource and capacity constraints preclude smaller organisations from full participation in the process. Sadly, reports of the human rights situation in Colombia, in particular the plight of trade unionists, continue to be negative. Although the Government has made progress in legislative terms, the full implementation of measures at the local level remains incomplete and challenging

LAIF, Latin America investment facility, CIF Caribbean Investment Facility

2015 operational report
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
47 p.
Abstract: 
The Latin America Investment Facility (LAIF) and the Caribbean Investment Facility (CIF) are two of the EU’s regional blending facilities, innovative financial instruments that use EU development grants to leverage additional investment from European and Regional Development Finance Institutions to implement key infrastructure and private sector support projects in partner countries.
This report, which covers the Facilities’ operational activities in 2015, provides a detailed overview of projects funded in a wide range of sectors,
from transport and energy, to water, sanitation and the environment. The report also describes how LAIF and CIF support the EU’s development priorities in their respective regions by engaging with the private sector to ensure that development assistance has the widest possible impact and
contributes to poverty eradication and to economic growth and job creation.
The Facilities also support policy objectives related to climate goals, with projects that contribute to partner countries’ capacity to adapt to and
mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Agricultural Trade Liberalization

Policies and Implications for Latin America
Agricultural Trade Liberalization
Publisher: 
IDB
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
374 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This book investigates key issues in regard to liberalization of agricultural trade in the Western Hemisphere, including potential scenarios for liberalization at the regional and multilateral levels, the effects of U.S. and European Union agricultural policies on trade, and how a Free Trade Area of the Americas and a European Union-MERCOSUR trade agreement might affect agricultural trade flows. It also examines agricultural liberalization in the U.S.-Central America Free Trade Agreement and suggests a food security typology for use by the World Trade Organization.

Overview and figures

in-depth analysis
Overview and figures
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
24 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Trade relations between the EU and Latin American countries have come back into the spotlight in recent years. Collectively, the countries forming the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) represent the fifth largest trading partner of the EU. The EU has concluded agreements with two Latin American (LA) groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group) and with four other Latin American countries (Mexico, Chile, Peru and Colombia). The FTAs concluded by the EU with Latin American countries differ considerably in terms of coverage and methodology depending on the time at which they were concluded and the context of the negotiations. The EU now aims to modernise the oldest FTAs, concluded with Mexico and Chile, in order to align them to the current standards of EU FTAs. The longstanding negotiations on a comprehensive trade agreement with Mercosur – which would mean the EU then had trade agreements with nearly all of Latin America – are yet to pick up pace, however

Beyond the Recovery

Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Trade and Integration Monitor : Beyond the Recovery: Competing for Market Share in the Digital Era
Publisher: 
IDB
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
566, 111 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The Trade and Integration Monitor 2017 analyzes the current trade recovery and assesses the capacity of the region to compete in global markets. It argues that, having overcome the longest trade contraction in recent history, Latin American and Caribbean countries face a trade outlook substantially less favorable than the one prevailing before the crisis. The end of the commodity price super cycle signals the urgent need for policies aimed at boosting competitiveness and at taking advantage of the opportunities provided by disruptive technologies such as e-commerce. - See more at: https://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/8642#sthash.zwColfIU.dpuf

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