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Economic cooperation

Mexico :

Economic indicators and trade with EU
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Mexico's economy is the 15th largest in the world (in terms of GDP) and the second largest in Latin America, after Brazil. It is currently classified as an upper middle-income economy by the World Bank, and is a member of the WTO, the OECD and the G20. The EU is Mexico's third-largest trading partner after the US and China, and its second biggest export market after the US. Our infographic, produced in close cooperation with GlobalStat, provides a quick and useful overview of Mexico's main economic ...

ACP-EU relations beyond 2020

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2p.
Abstract: 
Twenty-eight European Union (EU) Member States and 78 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries are legally bound by the provisions of the Cotonou Agreement, with its three intertwined pillars: a political dimension, development strategies and economic and trade cooperation. In
February 2020, the Cotonou Agreement will expire and a new relationship has to be designed, taking into account the achievements and shortcomings of the agreement. The EU position is expected by May 2017. The European Parliament's consent will be required before a new agreement is concluded

Building SME competitiveness in the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean

policy proposals by the private sector
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
38 p.
Abstract: 
SMEs as economic agents are being called upon to play a new and important role in boosting relations between Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union (see box 2). These two regions are closely linked from the economic viewpoint, in particular through trade and direct investment as well as through the long-standing exchange of people and ideas. Today, the growth of Latin America and the Caribbean can be a factor for mitigating the impact of the crisis in Europe. The internationalization of SMEs, beyond helping to generate employment and increase incomes, offers the possibility of adding value at origin and introducing improvements in production which will boost the market share of such firms, promoting more vigorous entrepreneurship. To this end it is essential for them to reduce productivity gaps by incorporating technology, innovations and knowledge into products, as well as to foster management improvements.

Latin America - European Union cooperation

a partnership for development
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
145 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union has taken special interest in promoting development cooperation as an instrument along with framework and association agreements. Today, the countries making up the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) are in a far different position from the one envisaged in the early 1990s.
Nearly 15 years on from the launch of the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribberan States (CELAC, formerly the Rio Group), it is important to look at the future prospects for cooperation. During this change, the strategic partnership between the European Union and CELAC will continue, so European Union cooperation must also change to meet this challenge.
Summary .-- I. Official development assistance from the European Union in the global context .-- II. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013 .-- III. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013, from commitment
to execution .-- IV. European Union cooperation 2014-2020 .-- V. Conclusions.

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

L'ampliació de la Unió Europea

els efectes a l'Amèrica Llatina
Publisher: 
INEHCA
City: 
Barcelona
Volume, number, page: 
9:31, pp.67-85
Abstract: 
With the accession of ten new countries on May 1, 2004, the European Union completed its largest ever extension. With the current 25 members, the EU is consolidated as one of the biggest markets in the world and, as is logical, this new reality entails political and economic upheavals. The author shows how this process has aroused an incipient fear among EU partners in Latin America due to this greater interest shown in the Eastern European countries. Countries whose economy is based on agriculture and livestock, such as Argentina, fear that the new agrarian markets (particularly Poland) may affect their trade dealings with the EU. Nevertheless, for the moment, events have allayed these fears. Be that as it may, the author feels that it is imperative that the traditional relations between European and Latin America continue to be strengthened, based on a certain scale of shared values, as the only way to make progress in the strategic cooperation of the two partners, and thus bring greater stability and democracy to an increasingly more globalised world.

Central American Economic Integration

An Introduction to the Study of Customs Union and Relations with the European Union
Publisher: 
UCM
City: 
Madrid
Volume, number, page: 
45 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This Working Paper focuses on the characteristics and challenges of the process of economic integration in Central America and it analyses the situation and alternatives of the existing customs union in the region. It also refers to the external relations of Central America, in particular with the European Union (EU), the USA (CAFTA) and Mexico (Plan Puebla Panama). In order to extend the analytical scope, Central American relations with the EU have been considered in the general context of the relations between Latin America and the EU (Group of Rio Dialogue).
The Paper emphasizes the importance of strengthening economic integration and improving external relations of Central American countries. For this reasons, I suggest to establish a common budget in the region, with a revenue system based on national contributions and on the customs union incomes and an expenditure mechanism able to carry out structural projects. A common budget will reinforce the existing process of
integration, will contribute to the improvement of the international insertion of Central American countries and will boost economic social development in the region.

EU trade relations with Latin America

Results and challenges in implementing the EU-Colombia/Peru trade agreement
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
58 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Trade Agreement between the EU and Peru and Colombia has been provisionally implemented since the middle of 2013. However, based on limited secondary data available to date on its effects, this report shows that trade profiles have not been substantially altered. EU exports to Latin America are dominated by pharmaceuticals, machinery and vehicles, and have experienced very slight increases. Colombian exports to the EU have benefitted more than Peruvian exports from improved access, but oil and minerals remain the top exports. Fruit, vegetables, flowers and above all sugar cane and confectionaries have been the greatest beneficiaries of the tariff eliminations and reductions. Despite this lack of substantial change, the institutional arrangements and sub-committees created by the Agreement have been implemented. Civil society has also been involved in meetings of the Trade and Sustainability sub-committee, but resource and capacity constraints preclude smaller organisations from full participation in the process. Sadly, reports of the human rights situation in Colombia, in particular the plight of trade unionists, continue to be negative. Although the Government has made progress in legislative terms, the full implementation of measures at the local level remains incomplete and challenging
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