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Development policy cooperation

ACP-EU relations beyond 2020

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2p.
Abstract: 
Twenty-eight European Union (EU) Member States and 78 African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries are legally bound by the provisions of the Cotonou Agreement, with its three intertwined pillars: a political dimension, development strategies and economic and trade cooperation. In
February 2020, the Cotonou Agreement will expire and a new relationship has to be designed, taking into account the achievements and shortcomings of the agreement. The EU position is expected by May 2017. The European Parliament's consent will be required before a new agreement is concluded

Europen Union public diplomacy in Latin America

opportunities and challenges
Public diplomacy : European and Latin American perspectives.
Publisher: 
Lang
City: 
Bern
Volume, number, page: 
p.17-33.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Since its beginnings, the integration process of the European Union (EU) has been accompanied by the strengthening of its ties with other world regions. Making intensive use of political-diplomatic, economic, military and civilian instruments – such as strategic partnerships, agreements of a mainly commercial nature, sanctions, sponsorship of development cooperation and humanitarian aid in pursuance of its foreign policy (Miralles Solé, 2014) – the EU also promotes its links with the populations of foreign countries through public diplomacy. This work presents the main theoretical aspects of the EU’s public diplomacy, the strategies and programmes employed and the transformations they have undergone as a consequence of technological progress. It highlights the impact this public diplomacy has had on relations with Latin America and draws some conclusions regarding the challenges and opportunities it offers. * Since its beginnings, the integration process of the European Union (EU) has been accompanied by the strengthening of its ties with other world regions. Making intensive use of political-diplomatic, economic, military and civilian instruments – such as strategic partnerships, agree- ments of a mainly commercial nature, sanctions, sponsorship of devel- opment cooperation and humanitarian aid in pursuance of its foreign policy (Miralles Solé, 2014) – the EU also promotes its links with the populations of foreign countries through public diplomacy. Public Diplomacy 18 This work presents the main theoretical aspects...

European Union regional cooperation with Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Abstract: 
The EU has over 20 years of experience of regional cooperation with Latin America. Regional programmes have been the main tool to strengthen links between countries within the region, promote sub-regional integration, and foster bi-regional cooperation. 18 countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela) can take part in the regional programmes, under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI). Europe has strong historic and cultural ties with the Caribbean region, and a long tradition of close cooperation. The EU’s relations with Caribbean countries are based on political relations, trade and development funding at both national and regional levels. The Africa, Caribbean and Pacifi c (ACP) - EU Cotonou Agreement signed in 2000 by 15 Caribbean nations, is the framework for cooperation. It is complemented by the 2008 Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with CARIFORUM (the Forum of the Caribbean Group of ACP) and the 2012 Joint Caribbean EU Partnership Strategy. The Caribbean region represents the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago. The region also includes 17 territories with direct links to EU Member States (four French ‘outermost regions’; and thirteen ‘overseas territories’– six British, six Dutch and one French territory).

Latin America - European Union cooperation

a partnership for development
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
145 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union has taken special interest in promoting development cooperation as an instrument along with framework and association agreements. Today, the countries making up the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) are in a far different position from the one envisaged in the early 1990s.
Nearly 15 years on from the launch of the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribberan States (CELAC, formerly the Rio Group), it is important to look at the future prospects for cooperation. During this change, the strategic partnership between the European Union and CELAC will continue, so European Union cooperation must also change to meet this challenge.
Summary .-- I. Official development assistance from the European Union in the global context .-- II. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013 .-- III. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013, from commitment
to execution .-- IV. European Union cooperation 2014-2020 .-- V. Conclusions.

Shaping our common future

Latin America and the Caribbean-European Union Strategic Partnership
Shaping our common future : Latin America and the Caribbean-European Union Strategic Partnership
Publisher: 
Council of the European Union
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
89 p.
Abstract: 
The EU-CELAC Summit in June 2015 brought together 61 EU and Latin American and Caribbean leaders, including more than 40 Heads of State or Government. This publication gives essential information on the event and presents the most important documents adopted during the summit. It also provides the forewords by Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission and Rafael Correa Delgado, President pro tempore of CELAC.

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

Social-ecological resilience and stakeh olders

a qualitative inquiry into community-based tourism in the common wealth of Dominica
Publisher: 
Instituto de Estudios del Caribe
City: 
San Juan
Volume, number, page: 
44:1-2, pp.3-28
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Commonwealth of Dominica has one of the most depressed and volatile economies in the Eastern Caribbean due to perennial hurricane damage, depressed agricultural exports, the global recession,and volatile fuel prices. The European Union attempted to fortify their economy with grants to diversify Dominica’s tourism market.
Yet, little is known about the conditions required to improve the resilience of community tourism in island nations such as Dominica. To fill this gap, we interviewed 25 decision makers regarding the necessary conditions and characteristics of resilient tourism development in Dominica. Interviews focused on social, institutional, economic and ecological resilience dynamics as the island transitions into a tourism economy. In particular this research examined: sustainable tourism development practices; reactivity of communities to internal and external pressures; the importance of social capacities; institutional (governance) design; economic stability; and ecological security.
The data created baseline information from community and individual standpoints that provided guidance to enhance tourism products and the resilience of tourism dependent populations. The findings from this study represent a step forward in applying resilience theory to understand community tourism development.

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.

FAP APC-UE’s model of cooperation between the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean in the field of Higher Education, Science, Technology and Innovation

Publisher: 
CES - Centre of European Studies
City: 
Bucharest
Volume, number, page: 
11:1, pp.51-62
Abstract: 
If we think about the starting point of the cooperation between Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union, we may have various alternatives in mind, but the frameworks that have been set up in 1999 by the First LAC-EU Summit of Heads of State and Government and in 2013 by the First CELAC-EU Summit of Heads of State and Government, we encounter a biregional partnerships between peers, based on common grounds established by the two parts. As a continuation, the cooperation extended to education, which is one of the domains outlined as important from the very beginning and which produces effects upon other features. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse the formation of the Permanent Academic Forum (FAP ALC-UE), its methodology for the process of bioregional partnership and the process of Academic Summits organised by
its members.

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