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Development Policy

Beyond 2015: Perspectives and Proposals for Development Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
134 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) share a long history of political dialogue and bi-regional cooperation in which development has always played a key role. Both regions also share a commitment to multilateralism and cooperation and have collaborated at the regional and global level towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by September 2015.

In 2015, both regions will need to work jointly to determine new goals and targets for sustainable development in the post-2015 framework. This will raise considerable challenges for development cooperation between these two regions as well as for cooperation with other countries and regions. Given the changes that have occurred since the establishment of the MDG both within the two regions and on a global scale, the present situation as well as the capacities, responsibilities and aspirations of both regions within a post-MDG context need to be analysed. Both regions have to understand how global and regional developments have affected their strategic partnership and and how they can cooperate so as to effectively shape the new global governance of development.

Based on an agreement with the UE-LAC Foundation, this study aims to address two major objectives: firstly, the study examines the new framework for post-2015 cooperation and the agenda for the sustainable Development Golas (SDG), taking into account the new priorities established by the multilateral framework, the bi-regional relation and the new EU framework of cooperation for development initiated with the “Agenda for change”.

Secondly, the study aims to analyse the roles of the EU and LAC within this new framework based on their Strategic Partnership and the inter-governmental EU-CELAC process and to identify how the two regions could continue to cooperate within this context.

In order to work towards these objectives the Complutense Institute of international Studies (ICEI) of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Chair of International and Ibero-American Cooperation of the University of Cantabria (COIBA) have collaborated in organising a multidisciplinary team of specialists from both regions. Its members include as joint directors and researchers, professors José Antonio Sanahuja (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) and Sergio Tezanos Vázquez (University of Cantabria, Spain), and as researchers, professors Alejandra Kern (San Martin University, Argentina) and Daniela Perrotta (Buenos Aires University), Jorge Hernández Moreno, Fiorella Werniche and Débora Fagaburru have collaborated as research assistants on this project.

Latin America policies of European NGOs :

Recent trends and perspectives
Volume, number, page: 
39 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The objective of this study was to get a compact overview of current and future Latin America policies of the key European NGOs as a basis for mutual discussion and joint activities between European and Latin American NGOs. The following central research question was formulated: How do the European (non-governmental) agencies envisage their future policies and relationships (agenda, priorities, funding allocations) with Latin American partner organisations?

The Features of Development in the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group

Publisher: 
Springer Science & Business Media
City: 
Dordrecht
Volume, number, page: 
99: 3, pp.469-485.
Abstract: 
In this article we present a new proposal for the measurement of development, applied to the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group (ACP), conditional on their insularity, and with privileged relations with the European Union. Our index has been constructed attending to the criteria defined in the Goals of the Millennium Declaration. For this purpose we will use the P2 distance method for the year 2007, the last year for which data are available. This index integrates socio-economic variables that permit a territorial ordering of the Pacific ACPs, in terms of those partial indicators.

European Union regional cooperation with Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
2 p.
Abstract: 
The EU has over 20 years of experience of regional cooperation with Latin America. Regional programmes have been the main tool to strengthen links between countries within the region, promote sub-regional integration, and foster bi-regional cooperation. 18 countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela) can take part in the regional programmes, under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI). Europe has strong historic and cultural ties with the Caribbean region, and a long tradition of close cooperation. The EU’s relations with Caribbean countries are based on political relations, trade and development funding at both national and regional levels. The Africa, Caribbean and Pacifi c (ACP) - EU Cotonou Agreement signed in 2000 by 15 Caribbean nations, is the framework for cooperation. It is complemented by the 2008 Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with CARIFORUM (the Forum of the Caribbean Group of ACP) and the 2012 Joint Caribbean EU Partnership Strategy. The Caribbean region represents the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago. The region also includes 17 territories with direct links to EU Member States (four French ‘outermost regions’; and thirteen ‘overseas territories’– six British, six Dutch and one French territory).

The European Union as a Conveniently-conflicted Counter-hegemon through Trade

Publisher: 
UACES
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
9:4, pp.560-577
Abstract: 
This article addresses the failure by scholars of EU trade policy to fully explain the difficulties faced in realising the ‘normative’ goals contained within the European Union’s external trade policy and the conviction that it might be a ‘force for good’ through trade. In seeking to account for and, in particular, move beyond the failure to fully explain these difficulties, the article adopts a critical social science approach that focuses on relations of domination and the (potentially misleading) appearances that such relations tend to uphold. In contrast to the traditional view of the EU as a potential ‘force for good’, we conceptualise it as a site of domination, focusing in particular on three mechanisms through which this domination is achieved – expansive market (capitalist) exchange, the ‘Othering’ that tends to accompany such processes of expansion, and the de-politicisation necessary to achieve and/or legitimate these processes. The article proceeds to explore recent developments in EU trade policy, and in particular the Global Europe agenda and associated new generation of free trade agreements with trade partners in Asia and Latin America. In doing so, the article examines the extent to which processes of market expansion, Othering and de-politicisation have been realised in recent EU trade policy. It argues for a conceptualisation of the European Union as a conveniently-conflicted counter-hegemon through trade, whereby the EU presents itself as a potential “force for good” through trade, but simultaneously avoids the realisation of that potential (and justifies its non-realisation) by evoking the conveniently-conflicted status that arises from institutional constraints and both internal disagreements and external differences. This account, we claim, is both more plausible than the existing empirical accounts in that it is able to explain the consistent promotion of an apparently unrealisable ‘progressive’ agenda by the European Union, and an improvement upon those accounts in that it illuminates and demystifies relations of domination and certain ideas that act to uphold them.

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.

LAIF, Latin America investment facility, CIF Caribbean Investment Facility

2015 operational report
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
47 p.
Abstract: 
The Latin America Investment Facility (LAIF) and the Caribbean Investment Facility (CIF) are two of the EU’s regional blending facilities, innovative financial instruments that use EU development grants to leverage additional investment from European and Regional Development Finance Institutions to implement key infrastructure and private sector support projects in partner countries.
This report, which covers the Facilities’ operational activities in 2015, provides a detailed overview of projects funded in a wide range of sectors,
from transport and energy, to water, sanitation and the environment. The report also describes how LAIF and CIF support the EU’s development priorities in their respective regions by engaging with the private sector to ensure that development assistance has the widest possible impact and
contributes to poverty eradication and to economic growth and job creation.
The Facilities also support policy objectives related to climate goals, with projects that contribute to partner countries’ capacity to adapt to and
mitigate the impacts of climate change.

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