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Development Co-operation

Human rights dialogue between the European Union and Central America

City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
28 p.
Abstract: 
This report is a brief study of the political dialogue on human rights between the European Union and Central America and acts as a basis for the preparation of an own-initiative report by the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights. Political dialogue is today considered to be the European Union’s most important instrument for external action. It entails dialogue on equal terms that recognises the different situations of the parties involved and uses cooperation as a common working method.One result of this instrument is the development of relations with the Central American isthmus, based on the Framework Cooperation Agreement with Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua
and Panama, which was signed on 22 February 1993 and entered into force on 1 March 1999. The socalled San José Dialogue has also helped to contribute to the stability of these relations. The instability of the Central American region in past decades, caused by armed conflicts, has had a direct impact on the limited development of these nations. Nonetheless, and in spite of their terrible consequences, there is a social desire for change in the region, focusing on the improvement of living conditions in a peaceful context. Aware of the new development situation arising in the region, the European Union decided that it was appropriate to include Central America in its human development programmes, based on the promotion of democracy and human rights. This initiative gave rise to the Multiannual Programme for the Promotion of Democracy and Human Rights in Central America, which establishes different programmes for each country, and involves leaders and groups from civil society. By implementing these programmes the European Union is paving the way for comprehensive development among the actors involved. After analysing the above channels, this paper suggests a series of strategic recommendations to be considered as a preliminary analysis for the formulation of a framework strategy.

Giving substance to the strategic partnerships :

Brazil
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
n.7, pp.75-77
Category: 
Abstract: 
The first ever EU-Brazil Summit took place in July 2007 in Lisbon, under the Portuguese presidency, after the European Commission recommended that a strategic partnership with Brazil should be launched. The strategic partnership between the EU and Brazil recognises Brazil as the European Union’s most important economic and political partner in Latin America, thus Brazil now occupies a prominent place among the EU’s select number of strategic partners.

EU-Latin America relations :

Charting a course for the future, Report of the European Policy Summit
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
41 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Latin America and the European Union have great potential for future cooperation on a range of global challenges, participants told a conference co-organised by Friends of Europe and the Konrad Adenaur Stiftung. “Latin American countries are now largely dynamic democracies,” said Christian Leffler, Managing Director for the Americas at the European External Action Service. “This has allowed a strengthening of ties. The stock of EU investment in Brazil is bigger than EU investment in Russia and China together, and there is a long-standing relationship to build on.”

EU development cooperation with Latin America

Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Bruselas
Volume, number, page: 
12 p.
Abstract: 
EU development cooperation with Latin America is mainly conducted through the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) and its different geographical (regional, sub-regional and bilateral) and thematic programmes. Nevertheless, the 2014-2020 programming period has brought about the introduction of a new blending financial instrument for the region, the Latin American Investment Facility (LAIF), which combines EU grants with other resources. It has also seen the transition of most Latin American countries ...

International Agreements in Progress :

EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
8 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Cuba is the only Latin American country to have no bilateral agreement with the EU. Between 1996 and December 2016, relations between the EU and Cuba were governed by the 1996 Common Position, which subordinated cooperation and the conclusion of any bilateral agreement to the achievement of visible progress in the field of democracy and human rights on the island. Nevertheless, political dialogue and cooperation were re-launched in 2008, following a leadership change in the country, and in February 2014 negotiating directives for a bilateral EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement were adopted by the Council. After seven rounds of negotiation, the agreement together with the proposal for its conclusion was published by the Commission on 25 November 2016, and the agreement was signed on 12 December 2016. Its three main chapters concern political dialogue, cooperation and sectoral policy dialogue, and trade and trade cooperation. Human rights remain a contentious issue.
The agreement has been submitted to the European Parliament for consent to its conclusion. The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted a recommendation to give consent and an accompanying report on 20 June 2017; these are due to be voted during the July 2017 plenary session. The agreement also needs to be ratified by the EU's Member States.

The Features of Development in the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group

Publisher: 
Springer Science & Business Media
City: 
Dordrecht
Volume, number, page: 
99: 3, pp.469-485.
Abstract: 
In this article we present a new proposal for the measurement of development, applied to the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group (ACP), conditional on their insularity, and with privileged relations with the European Union. Our index has been constructed attending to the criteria defined in the Goals of the Millennium Declaration. For this purpose we will use the P2 distance method for the year 2007, the last year for which data are available. This index integrates socio-economic variables that permit a territorial ordering of the Pacific ACPs, in terms of those partial indicators.

Global Europe, Guilty!

Contesting EU neoliberal governance for Latin America and the Caribbean
Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis Ltd.
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
31:1, pp.123-139
Abstract: 
This article examines bi-regional governance between the European Union and Latin American and Caribbean countries as a source of social resistance and contestation. The analysis focuses on the contributions of a bottom-up and informal mechanism of litigation, the Permanent People's Tribunals against European Multinationals and Neoliberalism, to cognitive justice and as a challenge to the notion of neoliberal governance. It questions the underlying assumptions regarding global/regional governance and resistance in the literature on international relations and international political economy, and the type of development and regionalism promoted by EU institutions and governments in Latin America and the Caribbean. The article calls for a problematisation of the resistance that is mobilised through the Tribunals, which is not free of tensions but, nonetheless, contributes through practices of cognitive justice to unveiling the fragmented, and hence, contested, nature of EU neoliberal governance for Latin America and the Caribbean countries.

Higher education cooperation between the European Union, Latin America and the Caribbean

academic cooperation and mobility : bringing the two regions closer
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
87 p.
Abstract: 
This report provides an overview of key figures and impact of EU academic cooperation programmes implemented with Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) since 2007. The report analyses cooperation under the Programmes Erasmus Mundus, ALFA, Edulink and the Marie Curie Actions (2007-2013). Similar opportunities for mobility of students, staff and researchers, and for institutional cooperation between the two regions continue under the Erasmus+ programme and the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (2014-2020). More information about how to apply to Erasmus+ is included in Annex 1.

Towards the EU-LAC Knowledge Area

scientific and technological cooperation between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union for sustainable development and social inclusion
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
36 p.
Abstract: 
Climate change, demographic transitions, expectations for better health and greener and more inclusive economies are among the drivers for more scientific and technological cooperation and innovation. The Guadalajara Summit in 2004 therefore placed the development of an EU-Latin-Caribbean Knowledge Area on the political agenda of bi-regional relations. In 2010, this concept gains fresh momentum through the endorsement of a new Joint Initiative for Research and Innovation. The selection of concrete research collaborations, mostly from the 6th and 7th Research Framework Programmes included here, can only cover a small part of the wide thematic range of joint activities addressing problems and oportunities of mutual interest.These projects mobilise teams from across Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean and other continents as well. They are either still on-going or recently completed. New collaborations will come on-stream in 2010, 2011 and beyond to turn declarations into practice. They represent a sizeable potential for innovation in the direction of sustainable development and social inclusion, the focus of the 2010 EU-LAC Summit in Madrid.

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