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Development Co-operation

Food Security in the European Union, Latin American and the Caribbean

the Cases of Cuba and Spain
Food Security in the European Union, Latin American and the Caribbean : the Cases of Cuba and Spain
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
128 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This study analyses the impact of agrarian and food policies on food and nutrition security as well as on the food sovereignty of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) and the European Union (EU) during the period 2007-2015, - two regions with different agrarian policies (protectionism versus trade liberalisation), which faced different problems in the context of the world food crisis of 2007-2008. The study is conducted over three chapters which range from the theoretical framework, the agricultural policies and production structure of both regions, to a comparative study of Cuba and Spain.

Latin America - European Union cooperation

a partnership for development
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
145 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union has taken special interest in promoting development cooperation as an instrument along with framework and association agreements. Today, the countries making up the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) are in a far different position from the one envisaged in the early 1990s.
Nearly 15 years on from the launch of the strategic partnership between the European Union and the current Community of Latin American and Caribberan States (CELAC, formerly the Rio Group), it is important to look at the future prospects for cooperation. During this change, the strategic partnership between the European Union and CELAC will continue, so European Union cooperation must also change to meet this challenge.
Summary .-- I. Official development assistance from the European Union in the global context .-- II. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013 .-- III. European Union cooperation in Latin America, 2007-2013, from commitment
to execution .-- IV. European Union cooperation 2014-2020 .-- V. Conclusions.

The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean vis-à-vis the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: THE ENVIRONMENTAL BIG PUSH
Publisher: 
ECLAC
City: 
Santiago
Volume, number, page: 
109 p.
Abstract: 
This document analyses the aforementioned changes in four chapters that compare and contrast the realities of the two regions. After this introduction, chapter I analyses the new consensus represented by the signing of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals. Chapter II looks at the situation in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union in relation to global economic conditions, considering macroeconomic, trade and foreign direct investment matters, as well as production and industry. Chapter III reviews progress on the social front in the two regions. Chapter IV considers the position of the European Union and CELAC in relation to the new vectors of change, basically the digital economy and climate change. Lastly, chapter V offers some final considerations.

Poverty, inclusion, institutions 

a challenge for Latin America and the European Union
Publisher: 
Cacucci Editore
City: 
Bari
Volume, number, page: 
3;1, pp.101-118
Abstract: 
If, in the period immediately following the Second World War, the social market economy represented the attempt to implement the theoretical principles identified and developed by the authors of “Ordo”, of the Frieburg school, we ask whether today, as well, the model of the social market economy (SME) is able to respond to the challenges coming from a political and economic context that is inevitably changed. The process of European integration owes much to those principles and attempts at implementation of the same. Much, then, has been done, but even more remains to be done and, as “each horizon calls to a new horizon”, each problem refers us to the solution of new problems. For this reason, we have pondered the new challenges that await both the pure theorists and the policy-makers who take the social market economy as their model of inspiration. For this reason, we have centered our reflection on a paradigm whose components are: poverty, inclusion, institutions

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.

Environmental Governance in Latin America

Environmental Governance in Latin America
Publisher: 
Palgrave Macmillan
City: 
Basingstoke
Volume, number, page: 
XII, 338 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The multiple purposes of nature – livelihood for communities, revenues for states, commodities for companies, and biodiversity for conservationists – have turned environmental governance in Latin America into a highly contested arena. In such a resource-rich region, unequal power relations, conflicting priorities, and trade-offs among multiple goals have led to a myriad of contrasting initiatives that are reshaping social relations and rural territories. This edited collection addresses these tensions by unpacking environmental governance as a complex process of formulating and contesting values, procedures and practices shaping the access, control and use of natural resources. Contributors from various fields address the challenges, limitations, and possibilities for a more sustainable, equal, and fair development. In this book, environmental governance is seen as an overarching concept defining the dynamic and multi-layered repertoire of society-nature interactions, where images of nature and discourses on the use of natural resources are mediated by contextual processes at multiple scales.

Low carbon development in Latin America

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
15, 2017.
Abstract: 
In Latin America, the high economic dynamism experienced at the beginning of the 21st century reduced poverty, but also led to the creation of negative externalities such as increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions responsible for climate change. Latin America’s current development paradigm relies on extractive industries (mining, oil, gas, and timber) and the expansion of agribusiness activities. Yet this model is inconsistent with the low carbon development path outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement, and jeopardises Latin America’s economic, energy, and climate security.
Latin American countries share a number of features that are relevant to the transition to low carbon development. A low carbon set of policies in the region is fundamental for protecting the environment, fighting climate change, attracting foreign investments, re-organising the region’s economies, and creating new opportunities for social development.

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