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Development

Beyond 2015: Perspectives and Proposals for Development Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
134 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) share a long history of political dialogue and bi-regional cooperation in which development has always played a key role. Both regions also share a commitment to multilateralism and cooperation and have collaborated at the regional and global level towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by September 2015.

In 2015, both regions will need to work jointly to determine new goals and targets for sustainable development in the post-2015 framework. This will raise considerable challenges for development cooperation between these two regions as well as for cooperation with other countries and regions. Given the changes that have occurred since the establishment of the MDG both within the two regions and on a global scale, the present situation as well as the capacities, responsibilities and aspirations of both regions within a post-MDG context need to be analysed. Both regions have to understand how global and regional developments have affected their strategic partnership and and how they can cooperate so as to effectively shape the new global governance of development.

Based on an agreement with the UE-LAC Foundation, this study aims to address two major objectives: firstly, the study examines the new framework for post-2015 cooperation and the agenda for the sustainable Development Golas (SDG), taking into account the new priorities established by the multilateral framework, the bi-regional relation and the new EU framework of cooperation for development initiated with the “Agenda for change”.

Secondly, the study aims to analyse the roles of the EU and LAC within this new framework based on their Strategic Partnership and the inter-governmental EU-CELAC process and to identify how the two regions could continue to cooperate within this context.

In order to work towards these objectives the Complutense Institute of international Studies (ICEI) of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Chair of International and Ibero-American Cooperation of the University of Cantabria (COIBA) have collaborated in organising a multidisciplinary team of specialists from both regions. Its members include as joint directors and researchers, professors José Antonio Sanahuja (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) and Sergio Tezanos Vázquez (University of Cantabria, Spain), and as researchers, professors Alejandra Kern (San Martin University, Argentina) and Daniela Perrotta (Buenos Aires University), Jorge Hernández Moreno, Fiorella Werniche and Débora Fagaburru have collaborated as research assistants on this project.

Beyond the global crisis :

structural adjustments and regional integration in Europe and Latin America
Publisher: 
Routledge
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
298 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The book aims at offering a comparative, multi-perspective analysis of the different, at times parallel, at times with varying degrees of interdependence, macroeconomic and structural adjustments in the two continents against the backdrop of important processes of regional integration. Its reading offers a multifaceted appreciation of the reality emerging from the mixing up of longer run tendencies deepened by the brute force of the financial and then industrial crisis.

Migración y remesas nexos América Latina-Europa

Publisher: 
AECID
City: 
Madrid
Volume, number, page: 
n.8, pp.175-193
Abstract: 
El artículo examina los nexos entre migración, remesas y desarrollo, con base en estudios sobre la migración latinoamericana hacia Estados Unidos, España, Suiza e Italia, con el propósito de ilustrar las interrelaciones entre los determinantes de la migración, las características de los y las migrantes, las condiciones vigentes en los países receptores de migrantes y los patrones de envíos de remesas. Analiza la composición según sexo y calificación de los migrantes ecuatorianos y dominicanos, las tendencias en los flujos migratorios y la inserción ocupacional en los países de llegada, vinculando el volumen de remesas con la calidad de la ocupación de migrantes en los mercados laborales de destino. Concluye que no se han encontrado resultados claros sobre el tipo de impactos de remesas sobre la pobreza, el surgimiento de actividades económicas y las condiciones de vida en los hogares migrantes. Finalmente, pone en duda la continuidad de las remesas, dada la inestabilidad de los mercados de trabajo en los países de destino de migrantes, y la emergencia de políticas migratorias restrictivas.

Environmental Governance in Latin America

Environmental Governance in Latin America
Publisher: 
Palgrave Macmillan
City: 
Basingstoke
Volume, number, page: 
XII, 338 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The multiple purposes of nature – livelihood for communities, revenues for states, commodities for companies, and biodiversity for conservationists – have turned environmental governance in Latin America into a highly contested arena. In such a resource-rich region, unequal power relations, conflicting priorities, and trade-offs among multiple goals have led to a myriad of contrasting initiatives that are reshaping social relations and rural territories. This edited collection addresses these tensions by unpacking environmental governance as a complex process of formulating and contesting values, procedures and practices shaping the access, control and use of natural resources. Contributors from various fields address the challenges, limitations, and possibilities for a more sustainable, equal, and fair development. In this book, environmental governance is seen as an overarching concept defining the dynamic and multi-layered repertoire of society-nature interactions, where images of nature and discourses on the use of natural resources are mediated by contextual processes at multiple scales.

Understanding the CARIFORUM-European Union Economic Partnership Agreement

Publisher: 
BISA
City: 
Leicester
Abstract: 
On 15 October 2008, the Caribbean became the first region among the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group of countries to sign a ‘full’ Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union (EU).
Although the EPA process has generated widespread critical commentary, few analysts have stopped to
consider the motives of individual ACP countries and regions in their approach to the talks. In this paper we
consider the question of motives in relation to the CARIFORUM-EU EPA. Specifically, it asks why did
Caribbean trade negotiators feel it necessary or desirable to sign a ‘full’ EPA, containing numerous
provisions not actually mandated by the WTO, when the rest of the ACP was content to sign far less
ambitious ‘goods only’ interim agreements? In order to address this question, the paper goes beyond the
extant EU-ACP trade literature to draw insights from wider International Political Economy (IPE) scholarship,
which has analysed the actions of developing countries in relation to a whole range of ‘WTO-plus’ North-
South regional and bilateral FTAs. On this basis, the paper stands back from the complex details of the
agreement to analyse its wider significance, especially in terms the presumed trade-off between the
immediate economic benefits of improved and more secure market access against the longer-term costs of
sacrificing the regulatory autonomy, or policy space, deemed necessary to pursue the type of trade and
industrial policies deployed successfully in the past by both developed and (some) developing countries. Put
simply, the paper seeks to ascertain what ultimately the Caribbean gained from the EPA negotiations and at
what cost.

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