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Data collection

Proposal for the creation of an Observatory for Migration between the EU and Latinamerica and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Bruselas
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The creation of the Euro-Latin American Migration Observatory (EU-LAC-MO) responds to three pressing needs, specifically: databases of reliable and comparable empirical data; research into the causes and consequences of migration; and analysis of the policies developed by the institutions and their suitability for meeting the requirements. Based on the three key thematic areas of the structured dialogue (links between migration and
development; regular migration; and irregular migration), the functions of the Observatory would be as follows: 1) collation of existing databases and harmonisation of statistical methods; 2) dissemination of existing research and generation of new research to fill existing gaps; 3) analysis of public policy, dissemination of administrative manuals, identification of best practice and creation of performance indicators; and 4) application of international and regional legislation. The organisation could be part of the Euro-Latin American Foundation or of a body such as the IOM or SEGIB (Ibero-American General Secretariat). It should have an International Committee as its consultative and coordinating body, an Executive Committee
for operations and various national coordination branches. The funding for the Executive Committee could come from organisational budgets, from a trust fund or from a mixed system. The resources for projects and activities could be provided by international and national bodies or could come from international cooperation.

More than numbers :

How migration data can deliver real-life benefits for migrants and governments(Final version for World Economic Forum in Davos on 24 January 2018)
Publisher: 
IOM
City: 
Geneva
Volume, number, page: 
124 p.
Abstract: 
Migration is a complex global challenge. Around 258 million people are currently estimated to be residing outside their country of birth – a number that has almost tripled in the past 50 years. This has policy implications across a myriad of dimensions ranging from border management to labour market participation and integration.
Decision makers absolutely need one thing to devise appropriate policies: reliable information. Relevant, high-quality dataI is critical for designing, implementing and evaluating policies that can generate substantial economic, social and humanitarian benefits for countries and migrants alike.
Despite widespread consensus on the importance of data to manage migration effectively, the current availability of relevant and reliable data is still very limited. Even when data is available, it is often not used to its full potential (including new data which is being produced in abundance from digital devices). Unfortunately, the current debate focuses far too much on how to get more and better data – a technical debate for experts
in the engine room of politics. This report aims to shift this debate from theory into practice. Decision makers need to be convinced of the value that migration data can deliver. This report is intended to support decision makers in capturing concrete economic, social
and humanitarian benefits in line with targets they choose to prioritize – by leveraging the data that matters.

Evaluation of DG ECHO's Actions on Building Resilience in the LAC Region 02-10/2016

Final report : 02-10/2016
Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
142 p.
Abstract: 
This evaluation covers DG ECHO-funded initiatives aiming to increase the resilience of communities and countries to future stresses and shocks in Latin America and the Caribbean between 2012 and 2016. Exacerbated by growing urbanization, the region is exposed to natural hazards, political crises and climate change. ECHO contributions consist of the systematic inclusion of resilience into most of its humanitarian programs as well as the funding of dedicated risk reduction initiatives. ECHO funded a total 258 projects for an amount of 220 million Euros, 60% of this in Haiti and Colombia. Sustained risk reduction initiatives contributed to the growing commitment of regional and most national authorities to increase resilience. The effectiveness of resilience initiatives at community level depended to a large part on local and national ownership. When lacking, as often the case in Haiti, results were questionable. The recommendations include: to improve synergy and on-site cooperation between EU and EC development actors and ECHO, to focus efforts on fewer, larger, multi-partner initiatives, to support efforts at multiple scales within a country to assure a systems approach, and to develop a mechanism to objectively measure the impact on beneficiaries of past initiatives once a major stress or disaster occurs
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