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Cooperation

Beyond 2015: Perspectives and Proposals for Development Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
134 p.
Abstract: 
The European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) share a long history of political dialogue and bi-regional cooperation in which development has always played a key role. Both regions also share a commitment to multilateralism and cooperation and have collaborated at the regional and global level towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by September 2015.

In 2015, both regions will need to work jointly to determine new goals and targets for sustainable development in the post-2015 framework. This will raise considerable challenges for development cooperation between these two regions as well as for cooperation with other countries and regions. Given the changes that have occurred since the establishment of the MDG both within the two regions and on a global scale, the present situation as well as the capacities, responsibilities and aspirations of both regions within a post-MDG context need to be analysed. Both regions have to understand how global and regional developments have affected their strategic partnership and and how they can cooperate so as to effectively shape the new global governance of development.

Based on an agreement with the UE-LAC Foundation, this study aims to address two major objectives: firstly, the study examines the new framework for post-2015 cooperation and the agenda for the sustainable Development Golas (SDG), taking into account the new priorities established by the multilateral framework, the bi-regional relation and the new EU framework of cooperation for development initiated with the “Agenda for change”.

Secondly, the study aims to analyse the roles of the EU and LAC within this new framework based on their Strategic Partnership and the inter-governmental EU-CELAC process and to identify how the two regions could continue to cooperate within this context.

In order to work towards these objectives the Complutense Institute of international Studies (ICEI) of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Chair of International and Ibero-American Cooperation of the University of Cantabria (COIBA) have collaborated in organising a multidisciplinary team of specialists from both regions. Its members include as joint directors and researchers, professors José Antonio Sanahuja (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) and Sergio Tezanos Vázquez (University of Cantabria, Spain), and as researchers, professors Alejandra Kern (San Martin University, Argentina) and Daniela Perrotta (Buenos Aires University), Jorge Hernández Moreno, Fiorella Werniche and Débora Fagaburru have collaborated as research assistants on this project.

International Agreements in Progress :

EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
8 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Cuba is the only Latin American country to have no bilateral agreement with the EU. Between 1996 and December 2016, relations between the EU and Cuba were governed by the 1996 Common Position, which subordinated cooperation and the conclusion of any bilateral agreement to the achievement of visible progress in the field of democracy and human rights on the island. Nevertheless, political dialogue and cooperation were re-launched in 2008, following a leadership change in the country, and in February 2014 negotiating directives for a bilateral EU-Cuba Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement were adopted by the Council. After seven rounds of negotiation, the agreement together with the proposal for its conclusion was published by the Commission on 25 November 2016, and the agreement was signed on 12 December 2016. Its three main chapters concern political dialogue, cooperation and sectoral policy dialogue, and trade and trade cooperation. Human rights remain a contentious issue.
The agreement has been submitted to the European Parliament for consent to its conclusion. The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted a recommendation to give consent and an accompanying report on 20 June 2017; these are due to be voted during the July 2017 plenary session. The agreement also needs to be ratified by the EU's Member States.

Europe from the Outside

Expectations of Europe’s External Cultural Relations
Culture Report EUNIC Yearbook 2013/2014
Publisher: 
Göttingen
City: 
Stuttgart
Volume, number, page: 
v.6.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Culture opens doors and builds bridges to the peoples of the world. Emerging economic powers such as India, Brazil and South Korea have grasped the potential of culture in foreign relations and are already working on their external cultural policies. Europe’s history of democracy, tradition of human rights and practice of friendly co-existence means that it has a great deal to offer and it should be investing more heavily in cultural relations with the rest of the world. What initiatives are needed in the area of external cultural policy – and what does the world expect of them? 30 authors from 20 countries look for some answers.

Joint Communication to the European Parliament and the Council

Towards an EU strategy for international cultural relations
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
16 p.
Abstract: 
This Joint Communication proposed three pillars to advance work towards an EU Strategy for international cultural relations. First, the proposed guiding principles for EU action aim to ensure that EU action in this area promotes human rights, diversity, inter-cultural dialogue while respecting subsidiarity and complementarity and retaining policy coherence by promoting culture within existing partnership frameworks. The second pillar proposed three main strands to provide a focus for advancing cultural cooperation with partner countries, including: i) supporting culture as an engine for sustainable social and economic development; ii) promoting culture and intercultural dialogue for peaceful inter-community relations; iii) reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage. The third pillar proposes a strategic EU approach to cultural diplomacy: including enhanced European cooperation (notably between EU Member States and EU Delegations) and inter-cultural exchanges to promote the diverse cultures of the EU.

Planning, re-bordering and setting times

a comparative analysis of European and Latin American 'education spaces'
Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis Ltd.
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
11:4: pp. 520-537.
Abstract: 
The article compares educational regionalisation in Europe and Latin America. This analysis unveils the influence of three social phenomena in the two case studies, namely power, fields of activity and knowledge. Mostly, it focuses on the initiatives led by the European Union and the Organisation of Ibero-American States in order to implement large strategic, multi-government educational plans in each continent. The actions of international political players, the theories (or ‘ontologies’) embedded in these devices and the consequences for sub-national politics are observed.

EU Coalition Explorer , Rethink : Europe

Results of the EU28 Survey on coalition building in the European Union
EU Coalition Explorer , Rethink : Europe
Publisher: 
ECFR
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
748 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
Europe's capacity to act collectively has become an increasingly critical issue as both the importance of intergovernmental decision making and the level of political fragmentation have grown over the past years. Against this backdrop a debate has started in member state capitals and the EU as to how the Union can evolve and move forward. The survey and this presentation of its results aim to inform the debate on how a more capable and cohesive European Union can be built.
The EU Coalition Explorer presents the results of the EU28 survey conducted by ECFR in the 28 member states of the European Union. It illustrates the expert opinions of several hundred respondents who work on European policy in governments and think tanks. The explorer creates a visual understanding of the views held by Europe’s professional political class – information that otherwise is not available to policy makers or the public.
In four chapters on preferences, influence, partners and policies, the EU Coalition Explorer shows the potential for future coalition building between the EU member states. The document can be used as an interactive tool to locate the EU’s political center – or centers – from which a more capable and cohesive European Union can be built.

LASA Forum

50 Years
Publisher: 
LASA
City: 
Pittsburgh
Volume, number, page: 
XLVIII : 4, pp.1-20.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The association's quarterly newsletter. In addition to timely, research-based articles, the newsletter provides information about LASA activities, including how to propose panels and papers for the LASA congress, and serves as an important source of information on employment, grant opportunities and conferences of interest. It is the official vehicle for conveying news about the Latin American Studies Association to its members.

EU-CELAC: partners in crisis management?

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
41, pp.1-2.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Cooperation in crisis management remains a relatively unexplored topic in the bi-regional relationship between the EU and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean states (CELAC). However, with UN peacekeeping operations currently overstretched, Washington’s increasing proclivity to ‘lead from behind’ and the growing need to address transnational security threats multilaterally, there is a rising demand for regional actors to act in concert.
While the EU has assumed an increasingly prominent role as an international security provider, CELAC continues to look inwards as a result of the regionalised character of its security agenda. Moreover, recent developments have prompted the EU to refocus on it southern and eastern neighbours, thereby temporarily diverting its attention from external partners. Nevertheless, crisis management cooperation (CMC) has begun to flourish at bilateral level between the EU and individual CELAC countries.

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