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Cocaine

Study on judicial cooperation, mutual legal assistance and extradition of drug traffickers and other drug

related crime offenders, between the EU and its Member States and Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries
Publisher: 
Publications Office
City: 
Luxemburg
Volume, number, page: 
320 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The main goal of this study is to provide facts and figures as well as a detailed analysis on the function, use, obstacles to the implementation of, and any potential gaps in, Mutual Legal Assistance (MLA) existing mechanisms and extradition agreements. It also addresses other relevant elements to
allow for an initial evaluation based on the relevant information. This is to enable a decision to be made on whether, and if so how, judicial cooperation should/could be improved and with which instruments. It includes an evaluation of the need and the potential added value of entering into EU level MLA and extradition agreements, while also taking into account de facto situations such as the functioning of the judicial system and the application of fundamental principles. Within this main framework the objectives of this report are addressed in to offer outcomes which stem from the research process. The research strategy combines a general study of the existing cooperation between EU Member States and LAC countries, with a detailed study of judicial cooperation in Latin America, based on thorough research of particular LAC and European countries, together with a specific analysis of some variables related to this subject matter.

Europe and Latin America :

combating drugs and drug trafficking
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
26 p.
Abstract: 
Two decades of cooperation between Europe and Latin America to combat drugs and drug trafficking have had a limited impact in terms of reducing drug consumption and production and have not led to better control of the criminal networks involved in the trafficking. Given this lack of decisive progress, fresh debate is emerging in Latin America on possible alternatives to the traditional models for tackling drugs, which are often seen as increasingly obsolete. These alternatives include measures such as decriminalisation and partial regulation of the drugs market. This study contains recent data on illegal drug consumption and production in the EU and Latin America, a general overview of the policies adopted in both regions, and analysis of the main bi-regional cooperation tools and main aspects of the current debate on drug trafficking. The study concludes with a number of recommendations on how to reform the current drugs and drug trafficking strategies and programmes pursued by both regions and with other partners.

Shifts in Drug Policy

The More things Change, the More they Stay the Same
Publisher: 
Springer
City: 
Dordrech
Volume, number, page: 
53:5, pp.515-517
Abstract: 
A review essay on a book by Sayaka Fukumi, Cocaine Trafficking in Latin America: EU and US Policy Responses (Hampshire: Ashgate).

Governing Cocaine Supply and Organized Crime from Latin America and the Caribbean

The Changing Security Logics in European Union External Policy
Publisher: 
Springer
City: 
Atlanta
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, pp.1-18
Abstract: 
The logics of the European Union’s policy and practices against narcotic drugs in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have undergone a substantial shift the past decade: from development to security. Based on an empirical mapping of the EU’s drug-related projects in LAC, this article argues that an ‘integrated and balanced’ approach to drugs policy is being replaced by a bifurcation between the broader domains of development policy and security policy. Questions are raised as to how the EU’s projects on development and security might counteract one another, and how the Union’s programme aimed at dismantling transnational organized crime along the cocaine trafficking routes to Europe might have unintended consequences. While keeping in mind the shifting tectonics of the international drug prohibition consensus, the article goes on to analyze the increasingly salient security rationale in EU external drugs policy against the backdrop of the EU’s emerging role as a global security actor. In doing so, it touches upon the intrinsic tensions between human rights and (supra) national security.

Cocaine Trafficking in Latin America

EU and US Policy Responses
Publisher: 
Ashgate
City: 
Aldershot
Volume, number, page: 
283 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The post-Cold War world has seen the emergence of new kinds of security threats. Whilst traditionally security threats were perceived of in terms of military threats against a state, non-traditional security threats are those that pose a threat to various internal competencies of the state and its identity both home and abroad. The European Union and the United States have identified Latin American cocaine trafficking as a security threat, but their policy responses to it have differed. This book examines the ways in which the EU and the US have conceptualized this threat. Furthermore, it explores the impact of cocaine trafficking on four state functions - economic, political, public order and diplomatic - in order to explain why it has become 'securitized'. Appealing to a variety of university courses, this book is especially relevant to security studies and European and US policy analysis, as well as criminology and sociology

Transatlantic drug trafficking

via Africa
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
3, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
The growing consumer market for illicit substances in Europe also poses challenges for West Africa. This Alert shows how its optimal geographical location is turning it into a hotbed for smuggling networks operating out of Latin America.
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