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The effects of human rights related clauses in the EU-Mexico Global Agreement and the EU-Chile Association Agreement:

Ex-Post Impact Assessment
Publisher: 
EPRS
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
257 p.
Abstract: 
The democracy clause in the EU-Mexico Global Agreement and by extension the EU-Mexico Free Trade Agreement calls for respect for fundamental human rights. If these are breached, a sanctioning clause can be invoked. The widely reported violations of human rights in Mexico are tackled through political dialogue. The agreement includes cooperation articles on social policy, the results of which are non-binding. Against this background, it is difficult to make a clear link between the potential effects of human rights related clauses in the Global Agreement on the human rights situation in Mexico. The EU-Chile Association Agreement (AA) also includes a comprehensive Free Trade Agreement, which is subject to the democracy clause. More developed than that in the Global Agreement, this clause calls for respect for fundamental human rights; sustainable economic and social development; and commits parties to good governance. The AA also includes a suspension clause in case of breach of the democracy clause, and cooperation provisions, the results of which are non-binding. While these are more detailed than the ones in the Global Agreement, the impact of the EU-Chile AA on the human rights situation in Chile has been limited in its extent and to specific aspects of the social policy agenda. In both cases, the monitoring mechanisms of the EU agreements have generally been implemented properly – even if civil society participation in Chile was institutionalised late. These mechanisms have played an important role in nurturing cooperation, but the incentives created have not translated into sufficient pressure for the implementation of human rights related reforms. Rather than the EU FTAs per se impacting on ensuring the respect of human rights in Mexico and Chile, it is the cumulative effect of the liberalisation of trade in the two countries, the EU-Mexico Strategic Partnership, the role of all global players, and cooperation with international donors that have encouraged reform. Ultimately, whether or not reforms in favour of respect of human rights have been adopted and implemented was the result of domestic politics in Mexico and Chile.

EU-Cuba relations :

a new chapter begins
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
31 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement (PDCA) between the EU and Cuba, endorsed by the European Parliament (EP) on 5 July 2017, opens a new phase in EU-Cuba relations. Until now Cuba was the only country in Latin America without a cooperation or political dialogue agreement with the EU. The PDCA creates a framework for political dialogue and closer bilateral cooperation, including in trade. The parts of the agreement (mostly related to cooperation and trade issues) that fall within EU competence can already be applied provisionally, but the agreement will only enter into force in full after it has been ratified in all the EU Member States.
Since negotiations on the PDCA began in 2014, Cuba’s relations with the EU and individual Member States have intensified considerably. For the EU, the PDCA is a tool for supporting a process of change and modernisation in Cuba, while for Cuba it represents the ‘normalisation’ of the relationship with an important economic and trade partner and helps it to diversify its external relations.
Parliament will focus, in monitoring the implementation of the PDCA, on two areas of particular concern to the EP: human rights and civil liberties on Cuba, and the role of Cuban civil society.

Citizens in an interconnected and polycentric world :

Global trends 2030
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
174 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The report identifies several global trends that will shape the world in 2030. They include: •• The empowerment of the individual, which may contribute to a growing sense of belonging to a single human community; •• Greater stress on sustainable development against a backdrop of greater resource scarcity and persistent poverty, compounded by the consequences of climate change; •• The emergence of a more polycentric world characterised by a shift of power away from states, and growing governance gaps as the mechanisms for inter-state relations fail to respond adequately to global public demands

Civil society strengthens dialogue between the European Union, Latin America and the Caribbean despite the postponement of the EU-CELAC Summit

Publisher: 
EESC
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
n. 50 pp. 1-2.
Abstract: 
More than 120 participants took part in the 9th Meeting of European Union, Latin American and Caribbean organised civil society, which took place on 3rd and 4th October in Panama City. Representatives of civil society organisations from the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean, of regional and national advisory bodies, employers’ organisations, trade unions, and other economic and social organisations expressed their regret about the postponement and possible cancellation of the EU-CELAC Summit 2017, which was planned to take place at the end of October 2017 in El Salvador.

Community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publisher: 
Resilience Alliance
City: 
Nova Scotia
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, 9 p.
Abstract: 
This Special Feature gathers the results of five research projects funded by the 7th Research Framework Program of the European Union and aims to identify successful cases of community-based management of environmental challenges in Latin America.The funding scheme, Research for the benefit of Civil Society Organizations, fostered innovative research approaches between civil society and research organizations. More than 20 field sites have been explored, and issues such as trade-offs between conservation and development, scientific versus local knowledge, social learning, ecosystem services, community owned solutions, scaling-up and scalingout strategies, the influence of context and actors in effective environmental management and governance, and the conflicts of interests around natural resources have been addressed. Based on our experiences as project coordinators, in this editorial we reflect on some of the important lessons gained for research praxis and impact, focusing on knowledge of governance models and their scaling-out and scaling-up, and on methods and tools to enable action research at the science–civil society interface. The results highlight the richness of community-based management experiences that exist in Latin America and the diversity of approaches to encourage the sustainable community-based management of environmental challenges.

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America

Sexual violence against minors in Latin America
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
36 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Sexual violence against minors is a major problem in Latin America. Children are mostly at risk in their own homes, while adolescents are at risk in their homes but also in the wider community (for instance, schools or boyfriends). However, data is very limited due to silence around the issue. Latin America is highly patriarchal, is riven by inequalities within and between social groups, and has weak judicial institutions; these are all factors that impact on gender based violence. However, governments in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, and Paraguay are starting to see children as individuals with rights, rather than minors under the sole authority of fathers, and are designing laws and agencies to protect those rights. Civil society in the meantime is increasingly mobilising against violence against women, including violence against girls, two forms of violence that go hand in hand, at a time when the problem is increasingly recognised and acted upon globally. This report outlines possibilities for the EU to support these recent developments and initiatives to end violence against minors via the establishment of national action plans, in collaboration with national, regional and global partners.

Environmental Governance in Latin America

Environmental Governance in Latin America
Publisher: 
Palgrave Macmillan
City: 
Basingstoke
Volume, number, page: 
XII, 338 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The multiple purposes of nature – livelihood for communities, revenues for states, commodities for companies, and biodiversity for conservationists – have turned environmental governance in Latin America into a highly contested arena. In such a resource-rich region, unequal power relations, conflicting priorities, and trade-offs among multiple goals have led to a myriad of contrasting initiatives that are reshaping social relations and rural territories. This edited collection addresses these tensions by unpacking environmental governance as a complex process of formulating and contesting values, procedures and practices shaping the access, control and use of natural resources. Contributors from various fields address the challenges, limitations, and possibilities for a more sustainable, equal, and fair development. In this book, environmental governance is seen as an overarching concept defining the dynamic and multi-layered repertoire of society-nature interactions, where images of nature and discourses on the use of natural resources are mediated by contextual processes at multiple scales.

The economic impact of violence in LAC

implications for the EU
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
16, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the costs arising from violence outweigh the expenditure devoted to preventing or containing it. To help address this, the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) has developed a model that measures both overt and hidden expenditures. In this report for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), José Luengo-Cabrera suggests that the IEP model can serve as a benchmark for assessments of the cost-effectiveness of public security programmes, and inform decisions on optimising the levels of spending needed to contain violence. He also discusses the lessons of the model and its results for the EU.

Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon

from Madrid to Santiago.
Publisher: 
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
The purpose of this publication, the third in the series “Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon”, is to identify the content to be included in this new space for bi-regional dialogue on gender issues with regard to violence against women and the importance of the participation of defenders of women’s rights in this area.
Taken from articles written by prominent defenders of women’s rights, academicians and representatives of civil society, this third publication focuses mainly on legal aspects and legislation. It aims to make headway in the debate on the need for effective legal frameworks, as well as in other related
issues such as statistical records and action protocols, not forgetting the need for comprehensive government polices to eradicate violence against women. These are numerous challenges that require a firm commitment from the states, from the EU and CELAC, just as civil society demands.
he novelty of this third publication is that in addition to articles on Latin American countries such as Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, El Salvador, Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, it also includes articles on European countries like Italy and Spain, highlighting the magnitude and global nature of this
phenomenon. Organisations from both continents have therefore joined forces to request an effective, efficient response to this serious violation of human rights: violence against women and its most extreme manifestation, feminicide or femicide.

Citizen security in Latin America.

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
14 mayo, 201, pp.1-2.
Abstract: 
This Alert explains why the reduction of lethal violence and other forms of victimisation is a precondition for ensuring inclusive and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).

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