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Citizen Security

Novena Reunión del mecanismo del diálogo especializado de alto nivel en materia de drogas entre la Comunidad Andina y la Unión Europea

Informe
Publisher: 
CAN
City: 
Lima
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Luego de las deliberaciones del caso, el Mecanismo adoptó la siguiente agenda:
1. Situación de la lucha contra las drogas en ambas regiones.
2. Información y seguimiento de otras reuniones relacionadas con la lucha contra las drogas.
3. Debate Temático: Desarrollo Alternativo.
4. Cooperación: Situación de los proyectos en curso (PRECAN - Drogas de Síntesis).
5. Programa Indicativo Regional 2007-2013 (Regional Strategy Paper)
6. Esfuerzos de reducción de la demanda
7. Varios

Citizens in an interconnected and polycentric world :

Global trends 2030
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
174 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
The report identifies several global trends that will shape the world in 2030. They include: •• The empowerment of the individual, which may contribute to a growing sense of belonging to a single human community; •• Greater stress on sustainable development against a backdrop of greater resource scarcity and persistent poverty, compounded by the consequences of climate change; •• The emergence of a more polycentric world characterised by a shift of power away from states, and growing governance gaps as the mechanisms for inter-state relations fail to respond adequately to global public demands

EU security cooperation with Latin America :

A priority requiring consolidation
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
12 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Although security cooperation is not yet a well-consolidated priority for the EU in its relations with Latin America, it has acquired increasing importance with the explicit inclusion of citizen security as a new priority area in the 2015 EU-CELAC action plan. The main current areas of EU security-related cooperation with the region are the fight against drugs; violence prevention; conflict resolution in Colombia, with an EU stake in its peace process; and the participation of some Latin American countries in EU crisis-management operations in the framework of the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy. This is achieved through trans-regional, regional, sub-regional and bilateral programmes and projects, as well as through the conclusion of framework agreements with certain Latin American countries. The European Parliament is particularly involved in promoting security cooperation with the region, as evidenced by its support for a Euro-Latin American Charter for Peace and Security, in the framework of the Euro-Latin American Parliamentary Assembly, and the adoption of specific resolutions on the subject.

Categorising the crime–terror nexus in the European Union

Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis Ltd.
City: 
Abingdon
Volume, number, page: 
15: 3-4, pp.259-274
Abstract: 
For the past 10 years, the crime–terror nexus has been used as an analytical model to understand the relationship between organised crime and terrorism in many of the world's (post) conflict and developing countries. Yet, aside from tangent and anecdotal evidence, little academic research has tried to understand how the nexus operates from within Western democracies and the implications that such internal relationships have on its social and economic security. Evidence related to these linkages in the European Union are immense; however, scholarly literature has shied away from these associations and turned their focus primarily on the nexus in more unstable regions, particularly in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and South East Asia. This article– based on a study funded by the European Parliament in 2013– provides a qualitative analysis of the crime-terror nexus as it functions in Europe (including its border regions) to determine the operational structure of the nexus as well as where and how linkages between organised crime and terrorism interact. Indeed, organised criminal and terrorist groups have found niches of cooperation and ‘marriages of convenience’ in the EU‘s social and political landscape to operate in an efficient and effective manner. Evidence suggests that, although the nexus model provides a sound assessment of these relationships, the proclivities of the region (a relatively stable socio-economic and political environment) keep the relationship between organised crime and terrorism on one end of the spectrum, focusing on alliances, appropriation of tactics, and integration. Moreover, the EU’s relationship to its regional borders and the operational incentives for organised crime and terrorism in these areas, provide ample opportunities for a convergence of organised crime and terrorist financing.

Cooperation Program between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policies

Action Document for COPOLAD II - Cooperation Programme between Latin America, the Caribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policie
Publisher: 
European Commission
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
18 p.
Abstract: 
The proposed action “COPOLAD II – Cooperation programme between Latin America, theCaribbean and the European Union on Drugs Policies” is part of the Multi-Annual Regional Indicative Programme for Latin America for the financial period 2014-2020, specifically the priority area on the security-development nexus, which seeks to promote security conditions conducive to inclusive development. Building on the first phase of COPOLAD, this particular action aims at supporting the capacity of beneficiary states and communities to develop integrated, balanced and human rights-based national drug policies covering both drug demand and supply reduction efforts, in line with the principle of co-responsibility. Expected
results are an increased capacity to monitor drug issues and to formulate integrated, balanced and evidence-based drug policies at national level; reduced drug production, reduced demand and harm of drugs and reduced levels of drug trafficking; strengthened action against illicit financial flows and money laundering deriving from drug trafficking; increased control of precursors; and a strengthened EU-CELAC (Community of Latin American and Caribbean States) Coordination and Cooperation Mechanism on Drugs. During the identification and formulation phases, the results and lessons learnt of the ongoing (first) phase of COPOLAD as well as of other relevant EU initiatives, like the Cocaine Route Programme, funded under the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace, were carefully analysed and taken into account. Preliminary consultations were also carried out with the Latin American and Caribbean beneficiaries.

Governing Cocaine Supply and Organized Crime from Latin America and the Caribbean

The Changing Security Logics in European Union External Policy
Publisher: 
Springer
City: 
Atlanta
Volume, number, page: 
22:1, pp.1-18
Abstract: 
The logics of the European Union’s policy and practices against narcotic drugs in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have undergone a substantial shift the past decade: from development to security. Based on an empirical mapping of the EU’s drug-related projects in LAC, this article argues that an ‘integrated and balanced’ approach to drugs policy is being replaced by a bifurcation between the broader domains of development policy and security policy. Questions are raised as to how the EU’s projects on development and security might counteract one another, and how the Union’s programme aimed at dismantling transnational organized crime along the cocaine trafficking routes to Europe might have unintended consequences. While keeping in mind the shifting tectonics of the international drug prohibition consensus, the article goes on to analyze the increasingly salient security rationale in EU external drugs policy against the backdrop of the EU’s emerging role as a global security actor. In doing so, it touches upon the intrinsic tensions between human rights and (supra) national security.

Shaping our common future

Latin America and the Caribbean-European Union Strategic Partnership
Shaping our common future : Latin America and the Caribbean-European Union Strategic Partnership
Publisher: 
Council of the European Union
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
89 p.
Abstract: 
The EU-CELAC Summit in June 2015 brought together 61 EU and Latin American and Caribbean leaders, including more than 40 Heads of State or Government. This publication gives essential information on the event and presents the most important documents adopted during the summit. It also provides the forewords by Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission and Rafael Correa Delgado, President pro tempore of CELAC.

Cocaine Trafficking in Latin America

EU and US Policy Responses
Publisher: 
Ashgate
City: 
Aldershot
Volume, number, page: 
283 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The post-Cold War world has seen the emergence of new kinds of security threats. Whilst traditionally security threats were perceived of in terms of military threats against a state, non-traditional security threats are those that pose a threat to various internal competencies of the state and its identity both home and abroad. The European Union and the United States have identified Latin American cocaine trafficking as a security threat, but their policy responses to it have differed. This book examines the ways in which the EU and the US have conceptualized this threat. Furthermore, it explores the impact of cocaine trafficking on four state functions - economic, political, public order and diplomatic - in order to explain why it has become 'securitized'. Appealing to a variety of university courses, this book is especially relevant to security studies and European and US policy analysis, as well as criminology and sociology
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