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Central America

Relations between El Salvador and European Union Identification of TOP 10 imported/exported products

The analysis of a possible market extension
Publisher: 
University of Economics
City: 
Prague
Volume, number, page: 
17 p.
Category: 
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
This paper deals with relation between El Salvador and European Union. It contains a review of existing cooperation agreements between the regions. It's main goal was to identify the TOP 10 imported and exported products. It contains an analysis of a possible expansion of the market between them and an identification of products where there is commercial potential.

The Caribbean in the European Union-Community of Latin American and Caribbean States Partnership

The Caribbean in the European Union-Community of Latin American and Caribbean States Partnership
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
125 p.
Abstract: 
Historically, the relationship between Latin America and the Anglophone Caribbean had been termed “distant”. Although the warming of relations started several decades before, the 1990s – the post-Cold War era – saw an intensification of engagement, fuelled by the imperatives of globalisation and the need for collaboration in an increasingly interdependent world. The strongest indication of the two sub-regions’ commitment to collaboration thus far was the establishment of CELAC in 2011.
In 2013, CELAC became the organism through which the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region relates to the European Union (EU) in a strategic partnership, established between the two parties since 1999. A strengthened CELAC is therefore necessary for enhancing the Bi-regional Partnership. Some of CELAC’s objectives are to promote regional integration, strengthen regional unity, and develop ties of solidarity and cooperation among LAC countries. The aim of this study revolves around achieving the above objectives, which inform the main research question: how can the participation of the Caribbean in CELAC be strengthened in order to boost CELAC and the Bi-regional Strategic Partnership? The Caribbean, in the case of the study is defined as CARIFORUM. However, we note that challenges of relationsbetween the Caribbean and Latin America are being experienced predominantly by CARICOM states, the non – Latin members of the Caribbean sub-grouping. As the Caribbean relates to the EU in the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) group, the study also examines the ACP-EU relationship vis-à-vis the Caribbean’s engagement in CELAC and the Bi-regional Strategic Partnership.
Based on the work of Sandler (2010), the study adopts the view that the Caribbean’s participation in CELAC is likely to be enhanced and sustained on the basis of the challenges that it shares with Latin America, and proposes the following areas for collaboration: poverty and inequality,crime and security, food security, non-communicable diseases, financial vulnerability and governance and transparency.

China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union

a triangular relationship?
China, Latin America, the Caribbean & the European Union: a triangular relationship?
Publisher: 
EU-LAC Foundation
City: 
Hamburg
Volume, number, page: 
74 p.
Abstract: 
These are the Conference Proceedings of the Workshop-Seminar “China, Latin America and the Caribbean and the European Union – A triangular relationship?”
Based on China’s emergence as a new economic and political power and an active member of the international community, as well as the increasingly complex political and economic relationships this country has established both towards the European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean, the conveners of the Workshop-Seminar invited distinguished experts, scholars and representatives from international institutions to discuss the current political and economic dynamics between the three parties, and their implications. By identifying potential scenarios, opportunities, risks and challenges, the participants provided first-hand insights and assessed, in exchange with the audience, whether there was room for an enhanced political and economic collaboration between the three regions.

Social-ecological resilience and stakeh olders

a qualitative inquiry into community-based tourism in the common wealth of Dominica
Publisher: 
Instituto de Estudios del Caribe
City: 
San Juan
Volume, number, page: 
44:1-2, pp.3-28
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The Commonwealth of Dominica has one of the most depressed and volatile economies in the Eastern Caribbean due to perennial hurricane damage, depressed agricultural exports, the global recession,and volatile fuel prices. The European Union attempted to fortify their economy with grants to diversify Dominica’s tourism market.
Yet, little is known about the conditions required to improve the resilience of community tourism in island nations such as Dominica. To fill this gap, we interviewed 25 decision makers regarding the necessary conditions and characteristics of resilient tourism development in Dominica. Interviews focused on social, institutional, economic and ecological resilience dynamics as the island transitions into a tourism economy. In particular this research examined: sustainable tourism development practices; reactivity of communities to internal and external pressures; the importance of social capacities; institutional (governance) design; economic stability; and ecological security.
The data created baseline information from community and individual standpoints that provided guidance to enhance tourism products and the resilience of tourism dependent populations. The findings from this study represent a step forward in applying resilience theory to understand community tourism development.

An analysis of Central America and Eastern Europe Revealed Comparative Advantages

Publisher: 
IEECA Society
City: 
Minneapolis
Volume, number, page: 
1:1, pp.1-12
Abstract: 
The present study applies the revealed comparative advantages through the Balassa Index to determine the comparative advantages, disadvantages, and intra-product commerce tendencies between Central America and Eastern Europe with the purpose of determining the possibility of a free trade agreement for Central America. The approach of the study is through the connection between the European Economic Union and the Central American Common market, which shares a common background and relates them to research of Bela Balassa (1965) to determine how commerce between Central America and Eastern Europe has performed and the possibilities of growth that this commerce has through a free trade agreement. The study demonstrates the importance of analyzing competitive advantages. This paper presents the difference in competitive advantage between Eastern Europe and Central American establishing the benefits when negotiating a free trade agreement between both economic blocks. Therefore, analyzing and negotiating between products of competitive advantages may lead to a more sustainable economic growth.

Central American Economic Integration

An Introduction to the Study of Customs Union and Relations with the European Union
Publisher: 
UCM
City: 
Madrid
Volume, number, page: 
45 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This Working Paper focuses on the characteristics and challenges of the process of economic integration in Central America and it analyses the situation and alternatives of the existing customs union in the region. It also refers to the external relations of Central America, in particular with the European Union (EU), the USA (CAFTA) and Mexico (Plan Puebla Panama). In order to extend the analytical scope, Central American relations with the EU have been considered in the general context of the relations between Latin America and the EU (Group of Rio Dialogue).
The Paper emphasizes the importance of strengthening economic integration and improving external relations of Central American countries. For this reasons, I suggest to establish a common budget in the region, with a revenue system based on national contributions and on the customs union incomes and an expenditure mechanism able to carry out structural projects. A common budget will reinforce the existing process of
integration, will contribute to the improvement of the international insertion of Central American countries and will boost economic social development in the region.

Agricultural Trade Liberalization

Policies and Implications for Latin America
Agricultural Trade Liberalization
Publisher: 
IDB
City: 
Washington D.C.
Volume, number, page: 
374 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This book investigates key issues in regard to liberalization of agricultural trade in the Western Hemisphere, including potential scenarios for liberalization at the regional and multilateral levels, the effects of U.S. and European Union agricultural policies on trade, and how a Free Trade Area of the Americas and a European Union-MERCOSUR trade agreement might affect agricultural trade flows. It also examines agricultural liberalization in the U.S.-Central America Free Trade Agreement and suggests a food security typology for use by the World Trade Organization.

Overview and figures

in-depth analysis
Overview and figures
Publisher: 
European Parliament
City: 
Brussels
Volume, number, page: 
24 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Trade relations between the EU and Latin American countries have come back into the spotlight in recent years. Collectively, the countries forming the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) represent the fifth largest trading partner of the EU. The EU has concluded agreements with two Latin American (LA) groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group) and with four other Latin American countries (Mexico, Chile, Peru and Colombia). The FTAs concluded by the EU with Latin American countries differ considerably in terms of coverage and methodology depending on the time at which they were concluded and the context of the negotiations. The EU now aims to modernise the oldest FTAs, concluded with Mexico and Chile, in order to align them to the current standards of EU FTAs. The longstanding negotiations on a comprehensive trade agreement with Mercosur – which would mean the EU then had trade agreements with nearly all of Latin America – are yet to pick up pace, however

Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon

from Madrid to Santiago.
Publisher: 
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
The purpose of this publication, the third in the series “Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon”, is to identify the content to be included in this new space for bi-regional dialogue on gender issues with regard to violence against women and the importance of the participation of defenders of women’s rights in this area.
Taken from articles written by prominent defenders of women’s rights, academicians and representatives of civil society, this third publication focuses mainly on legal aspects and legislation. It aims to make headway in the debate on the need for effective legal frameworks, as well as in other related
issues such as statistical records and action protocols, not forgetting the need for comprehensive government polices to eradicate violence against women. These are numerous challenges that require a firm commitment from the states, from the EU and CELAC, just as civil society demands.
he novelty of this third publication is that in addition to articles on Latin American countries such as Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, El Salvador, Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, it also includes articles on European countries like Italy and Spain, highlighting the magnitude and global nature of this
phenomenon. Organisations from both continents have therefore joined forces to request an effective, efficient response to this serious violation of human rights: violence against women and its most extreme manifestation, feminicide or femicide.

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