Choose your language:

ACN

Institutional pioneers in world politics :

regional institution building and the influence of the European Union
Publisher: 
SAGE
City: 
New York
Volume, number, page: 
23: 3, pp. 654-680
Abstract: 
What drives processes of institution building within regional international organizations? We challenge those established theories of regionalism, and of institutionalized cooperation more broadly, that treat different organizations as independent phenomena whose evolution is conditioned primarily by internal causal factors. Developing the basic premise of ‘diffusion theory’ — meaning that decision-making is interdependent across organizations — we argue that institutional pioneers, and specifically the European Union, shape regional institution-building processes in a number of discernible ways. We then hypothesize two pathways — active and passive — of European Union influence, and stipulate an endogenous capacity for institutional change as a key scope condition for their operation. Drawing on a new and original data set on the institutional design of 34 regional international organizations in the period from 1950 to 2010, the article finds that: (1) both the intensity of a regional international organization’s structured interaction with the European Union (active influence) and the European Union’s own level of delegation (passive influence) are associated with higher levels of delegation within other regional international organizations; (2) passive European Union influence exerts a larger overall substantive effect than active European Union influence does; and (3) these effects are strongest among those regional international organizations that are based on founding contracts containing open-ended commitments. These findings indicate that the creation and subsequent institutional evolution of the European Union has made a difference to the evolution of institutions in regional international organizations elsewhere, thereby suggesting that existing theories of regionalism are insufficiently able to account for processes of institution building in such contexts.

Intercambio de experiencias entre los países andinos y Europa en materia de cooperación transfronteriza” informe de resultados

Informe de resultados, Proyecto CESCAN II
Publisher: 
CAN
City: 
Tulcán
Volume, number, page: 
47 p.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Documento que presenta las bases conceptuales, la institucionalidad de la Cooperación Transfronteriza, de aquí en adelante CTF, la importancia de contar con una Estrategia regional de CTF y el proceso que se va aplicar por parte de la Secretaría General de la CAN y su Programa de Integración y Desarrollo de Fronteras.
Parte 1. Análisis comparativo de las experiencias de cooperación transfronteriza en los países de la Comunidad Andina y en las regiones europeas. Contiene las opiniones y aportes de los participantes del Taller sobre las experiencias de CTF en
el área andina, en las euroregiones y una síntesis integral de esas aportaciones. Parte 2. Construcción de propuestas encaminadas a la definición de una Estrategiade Cooperación Transfronteriza entre los países de la Comunidad Andina.
Contiene las propuestas de los participantes, elaboradas a partir del establecimiento de la situación comparada que consta en la primera parte y que serán los insumos para la construcción de la Estrategia de Cooperación Transfronteriza.Parte 3. Próximos pasos en el proceso de construcción de la Estrategia Regional de Cooperación Transfronteriza. Contempla lo que se debe hacer de modo inmediato para dar inicio al proceso de construcción de la estrategia y los compromisos que se deben asumir para el efecto.

EU trade with Latin America and the Caribbean :

Overview and figures
Publisher: 
35 p.
City: 
Brussels
Category: 
Abstract: 
This publication provides an overview of trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings. The EU has fully fledged agreements with two Latin American groupings (Cariforum and the Central America group), a multiparty trade agreement with three members of the Andean Community (Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru), and bilateral agreements with Chile and Mexico. Since November 2017, a new agreement governing trade relations with Cuba has also been provisionally applied. In addition, the EU is currently modernising its agreements with Mexico (with which it has reached an 'agreement in principle') and Chile. The EU also has framework agreements with Mercosur and its individual members (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). The agreement with the former will be replaced, once the ongoing negotiations on an EU-Mercosur association agreement have been completed. This publication provides recent data on trade relations between the EU and Latin American and Caribbean countries and groupings, compares the main agreements governing trade relations that are already in place, and analyses the rationale behind the ongoing negotiations on the EU-Mercosur, EU-Mexico and EU-Chile agreements. This is a revised and updated edition of a publication from October 2017 by Gisela Grieger and Roderick Harte, PE 608.793.

The European Union’s Latin America policy

A study of Foreign Policy Change and Coordination
City: 
London
Volume, number, page: 
302 p.
Category: 
Abstract: 
This thesis explores the evolution of the European Union’s (EU) Latin America policy through an analysis of factors internal to the EU’s foreign policy decision-making system. Its policy towards the region has changed in important ways over time and appears to have come to be more and more incoherent. Adapting existing Foreign Policy Analysis frameworks to the specific context of the EU’s foreign policy, this thesis seeks to understand how factors of bureaucratic politics shape the EU’s foreign policy towards third actors. It is hypothesized that where an analytical perspective which evaluates the EU’s increased policy incoherence towards Latin America as the result of rational decision-making is not satisfactory, bureaucratic politics need to be considered instead. Under this perspective, the EU’s policy incoherence is influenced by policy inertia arising out of previous commitments, the divergence of views between different internal EU actors, the autonomy of these to take decisions without prior consultation or coordination with others, and lastly the complexity and duration of EU foreign policy decision-making processes themselves. This research framework is then applied empirically by analysing the EU’s negotiations for international agreements with partners in the Latin American
region, and particularly those with regional organizations since the 1990s. This thesis finds that despite attempts to strengthen foreign policy coordination and coherence in the EU over time, the coherence of its Latin America policy has indeed been affected by bureaucratic politics arising out of factors such as changes to the internal organization of the European Commission or the disruption of established coordination mechanisms
through the Treaty of Lisbon. The findings contribute to our understanding of the evolution of EU-Latin American relations, on-going debates on the study of interregionalism, as well as more generally to the literature on EU foreign policy-making.

The free trade agreements between the european union and latin america. the peruvian and mexican case

Publisher: 
Nicolae Titulescu University Publishing House
City: 
Bucharest
Volume, number, page: 
5:1, pp.817-827
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
The European Union has signed a number of free trade agreements with different countries in Latin America because it is aware of the great importance that this region has gained as a destination for its exports and investments. Furthermore, the European Union wishes to reaffirm its ties with countries in the region because it hopes to consolidate its political and economic position as an international player with its presence in those markets.
In this paper we will discuss the free trade agreements that the EU has signed with Mexico and later with Peru, because they are two examples where Latin American countries have achieved significant economic growth and where the trade has generated significant benefits. Additionally they are two major trading partners of the European Union and they have allowed the EU to continue to expand its zone of influence in Latin America.
Subscribe to RSS - ACN