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LUENGO-CABRERA José

Transatlantic drug trafficking

via Africa
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
3, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
The growing consumer market for illicit substances in Europe also poses challenges for West Africa. This Alert shows how its optimal geographical location is turning it into a hotbed for smuggling networks operating out of Latin America.

LAC’s insecure economies

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
4, pp.1-2
Abstract: 
With falling commodity prices, slowing Chinese growth and tightening financial conditions, the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have once again revealed their vulnerability to global headwinds – albeit to varying degrees. Dragged down by the faltering economies of Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela, the region has been experiencing economic deceleration for the past five years, with 2015 marking the first of overall regional contraction since 2009.

The economic impact of violence in LAC

implications for the EU
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
16, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the costs arising from violence outweigh the expenditure devoted to preventing or containing it. To help address this, the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) has developed a model that measures both overt and hidden expenditures. In this report for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), José Luengo-Cabrera suggests that the IEP model can serve as a benchmark for assessments of the cost-effectiveness of public security programmes, and inform decisions on optimising the levels of spending needed to contain violence. He also discusses the lessons of the model and its results for the EU.

EU-LAC

the other transatlantic partnership
Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
8, pp.1-4.
Abstract: 
This brief discusses the evolving nature of EU - Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) relations since the 1999 Rio summit. By evaluating the changing dynamics encountered internally and externally by both the EU and LAC countries, the author maps out the main issues which will be addressed at the EU-CELAC summit in Brussels in June 2015.

EU-CELAC: partners in crisis management?

Publisher: 
EUISS
City: 
Paris
Volume, number, page: 
41, pp.1-2.
Considered Countries: 
Abstract: 
Cooperation in crisis management remains a relatively unexplored topic in the bi-regional relationship between the EU and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean states (CELAC). However, with UN peacekeeping operations currently overstretched, Washington’s increasing proclivity to ‘lead from behind’ and the growing need to address transnational security threats multilaterally, there is a rising demand for regional actors to act in concert.
While the EU has assumed an increasingly prominent role as an international security provider, CELAC continues to look inwards as a result of the regionalised character of its security agenda. Moreover, recent developments have prompted the EU to refocus on it southern and eastern neighbours, thereby temporarily diverting its attention from external partners. Nevertheless, crisis management cooperation (CMC) has begun to flourish at bilateral level between the EU and individual CELAC countries.
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